Winners by Award

NEAFCS Grace Frysinger Fellowship

The Grace Frysinger Fellowship was established to provide an opportunity for an Extension Educator in Family and Consumer Sciences to study and observe family and consumer sciences education in other states or countries.

Background

The first Grace Frysinger Fellowship was established in 1951 by a direct grant of $500 from Miss Grace Frysinger, Home Economist of the Central States, Washington, D.C. NEAFCS now sponsors this fellowship. This fellowship is a tribute to Miss Frysinger because of her years of service as a field agent, her promotion of the organization of a national association and her contribution to the Extension Service.

Award

One fellowship of $400 will be awarded. This fellowship is to be used for two to four weeks travel, living expenses, and duplication of the report of the recipient. The recipient must submit a statement of expenses to the Vice-President Awards and Recognition, and the Treasurer, and return any surplus to the Treasurer.

Purpose

The Grace Frysinger Fellowship was established to provide an opportunity for an Extension Educator in Family and Consumer Sciences to study and observe family and consumer sciences education in other states or countries.

Eligibility

  1. The study must be completed before the next annual session following previous year awarded.
  2. The applicant must have had a minimum of five (5) years membership in NEAFCS.
  3. Upon completion of the study, the recipient will prepare a narrative report for publication and send copies of this report to the Journal of Extension, The Reporter and other appropriate publications. A copy of the report shall be sent to the Vice President for Awards and Recognition.

Application

  1. Complete On-line Awards Application and submit one printed copy.
  2. Study Plan — limit to five (5) double-spaced typed pages:
    1. Background of applicant-Extension experience, major programs, areas of expertise
    2. Study proposal and explanation
    3. Detailed outline of ways proposed to carry out this study
    4. Application of results of this study for future Extension work at the county, area or district level
  3. Letter of support from appropriate state staff or district administrator-briefly indicate how the applicant would be rated on these characteristics:
    1. Skill in planning and carrying out work
    2. Effectiveness of applicant's work
    3. Cooperation with other workers and organizations
    4. Attitude toward work and other workers
    5. Lesson presentation
    6. Adaptability

Judging Criteria 100 Total Points

  1. Plan for study — 40 points - How significant is proposed study to Extension program? Is purpose clearly stated?
  2. Application of study — 30 points - Does the applicant's plan use findings for future Extension work in county, city and / or area?
  3. Evidence of program accomplishments — 20 points - Is experience such that it will enable applicant to make good use of proposed observations? Will prior training enable applicant to carry out proposed plan? How significant are applicant's achievements?
  4. Practicability — 10 points - What are the methods for sharing results of study with other agents? How will this project be carried out financially if other costs are involved? Include the entire budget for the proposed project.

Procedure

  1. Submit one (1) copy of the application package, letter of support, and support materials for the Grace Frysinger Award as listed above to the appropriate affiliate chair by the affiliate due date.
  2. Affiliate chair will mail the winning application(s) postmarked no later than April 1 to ||VPAwardsFilecard||.
Distinguished Service Award The Distinguished Service Award is the highest award presented by the NEAFCS. The award recognizes members for leadership, educational program efforts and professional development.

Background

The Distinguished Service Award is the highest award presented by the National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences. The award recognizes members for leadership, educational program efforts and professional development.

Award

The award is a plaque presented by the National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences.

Purpose

This award recognizes Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Educators for leadership, outstanding programs, and personal and professional growth.

Eligibility

  1. Minimum of 10 years NEAFCS membership
  2. Evidence of superior accomplishments
  3. Award can be received only once
  4. Number of awards given per affiliate is determined by the number of paid members as of February 1 of the year:

    1-50 members - 1 nominee
    51-100 members - 2 nominees
    101-150 members - 3 nominees
    151-200 members - 4 nominees
    201-plus members - 5 nominees

Application

  1. Complete the On-line Awards Application and submit one printed copy.
  2. Program outline (Or as state affiliate guidelines dictate - please check with your state if they follow a different format) - limit to five (5) double-spaced typed pages:
    1. Program accomplishments-one or two most outstanding recent accomplishments
    2. Professional improvement-give evidence of professional growth through credit or non-credit courses, work toward advanced degree, professional association meeting, travel study, etc.
    3. Honors and awards
    4. Professional association membership and participation-list affiliate and national offices, committees, chairs

Judging Criteria 100 Total Points

  1. Program accomplishments - 50 points
  2. Professional improvement - 25 points
  3. Professional association participation - 25 points

Procedure

  1. Submit one (1) copy of the application package and support materials as listed above for the Distinguished Service Award to the appropriate affiliate chair by the affiliate due date.
  2. State affiliate chair will designate Distinguished Service Award winner(s) on On-line State Application Form no later than April 1. No further information is required from the State affiliate chair, as it has already been submitted through the individual's On-line Awards Application.

This award is judged by the Affiliate therefore no national judging sheets exist for this award. Continued Excellence Award The award recognizes NEAFCS members who have previously received the Distinguished Service Award and continue to be actively involved in professional improvement programs, the promotion of professional development of others, and leadership.

BACKGROUND

The Continued Excellence Award recognizes NEAFCS members who continue to be involved in professional development and leadership.

AWARD

The award is a plaque presented by the National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences.

PURPOSE

The award recognizes NEAFCS members who have been actively involved in professional improvement programs, the promotion of professional development of others, and leadership.

ELIGIBILITY

  1. Applicant must have been a member of NEAFCS for at least 12 years, including the current year.
  2. Applicant must have received the NEAFCS Distinguished Service Award prior to the current year.
  3. Applicant must have attended three Annual Sessions.
  4. Award can be received only once.
  5. Applicant must be actively involved in a professional improvement program including any or all of the following:
    1. Participation in informal (non-credit) professional development within the past three years
    2. Formal study toward an advanced degree (current or completed)
    3. Demonstration of personal commitment to professional development through participation in professional associations and contributions to state Extension Service and affiliate association
    4. The number of nominees allowed per affiliate is determined by the number of paid members as of February 1 each year:

      1-50 members - 1 nominee
      51-100 members - 2 nominees
      101-150 members - 3 nominees
      151-200 members - 4 nominees
      201-plus members - 5 nominees

APPLICATION

  1. Complete the On-line Awards Application and submit one printed copy.
  2. Program outline (Or as state affiliate guidelines dictate - please check with your state if they follow a different format)- limit to five (5) double -spaced typed pages
    1. List participation in informal (non-credit) professional development activities during the past three years
    2. Describe work toward advanced degree (if completed, indicate when)
    3. List involvement in NEAFCS and affiliate Extension Family and Consumer Sciences association plus any other related professional associations (do not include membership in honorary societies, civic and social)
    4. Identify year Distinguished Service Award was received and number of years of membership in NEAFCS
    5. List contributions to professional development opportunities of others
    6. Describe personal commitment to, and future plans for, professional development

JUDGING CRITERIA 100 total points

  1. Professional activities during the past three years - 40 points
  2. Participation in professional development and/or advanced degree in progress or obtained - 20 points
  3. Professional association membership and participation, contributions to professional development activities of others - 20 points
  4. Future plans for professional development - 20 points

PROCEDURE

  1. Submit one (1) copy of the application package and support materials as listed above for the Continued Excellence Award to the appropriate affiliate chair by the affiliate due date.
  2. State affiliate chair will designate Continued Excellence Award winner(s) on On-line State Application Form no later than April 1. No further information is required from the State affiliate chair, as it has already been submitted through the individual's On-line Awards Application.

This award is judged by the Affiliate therefore no national judging sheets exist for this award. Extension Educator of the Year This award is to recognize a professional Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Educator who is conducting outstanding educational programs that demonstrate impact on families.

Background

Extension Educator Award was established in 1994 to recognize an Outstanding Extension Educator who conducts outstanding educational programs that demonstrate impact on families. Originally the award was co-sponsored by Dow Brands and Maytag Appliances. Sole sponsorship was assumed from 1998-2003 by Maytag Appliances. In 2001 it became known as the Maytag Extension Educator Award. In 2004, NEAFCS took over the sponsorship of the award.

Award

One award of a $200 scholarship to attend the current year Annual Session and a plaque will be awarded.

Purpose

This award is to recognize a professional Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Educator who is conducting outstanding educational programs that demonstrate impact on families. The member is also involved in continued professional improvement activities and is active in professional organizations.

Eligibility

  1. Persons who are current members of NEAFCS and have previously received the Distinguished Service Award and the Continued Excellence Award.
  2. Member of NEAFCS for at least 12 years.
  3. Applicant is actively involved in professional improvement.
  4. Applicant must have a well-planned educational program with results and accomplishments.
  5. Applicant shows leadership in professional associations.
  6. Applicant has attended at least four (4) NEAFCS Annual Sessions.
  7. This award can be received only once.
  8. A display at the Showcase of Excellence is required at Annual Conference the year the award is received to showcase an outstanding program of the recipient.

Application

Application is to be sent in a notebook with tabs for each of the five areas identified.

  1. Complete the Online Awards Application and submit one printed signed copy.
  2. Program outline — limit to five (5) double-spaced typed pages.
    1. Description of community partnership
    2. Program description
    3. Accomplishments / Impacts
    4. Role of NEAFCS applicant(s) in partnership
    5. Future implications
  3. Two letters of support from consumers, Extension faculty/supervisors, or agencies describing impact of community partnership on families or individuals.
  4. Supporting material — limit to five (5) pieces. Please package appropriately for the types of supplemental materials submitted. See suggestions under Communication Awards for specific supplementary materials. Put all labeled materials securely in a three prong folder or view binder.

Judging Criteria 100 Total Points

Entries will be evaluated for outstanding efforts and/or accomplishments in leadership, personal and professional growth and outstanding programs impact families.

  1. Program accomplishments — 50 points
  2. Professional improvement and leadership — 30 points
  3. Professional association participation — 20 points

Procedure

  1. Submit one (1) copy of the application notebook for the Extension Educator of the Year Award and letters of support, as listed above, along with the On-line Awards Application to the appropriate affiliate chair by the affiliate due date.
  2. There is no limit to the number of applications per affiliate. Affiliate chair will mail all applications postmarked no later that April 1 to ||VPAwardsFilecard||.

Florence Hall Award The Florence Hall Award is presented for an outstanding program conducted by one or more NEAFCS members who have been alert in recognizing new concerns and interests of families and have involved people in planning and implementing programs that benefit families.

Background

In 1952, Miss Florence Hall, Regional Field Agent-Eastern States, Federal Extension Service, initiated this award to recognize outstanding accomplishments of NEAFCS members.

Award

Three (3) Florence Hall awards are presented: First Place, $200; Second Place, $100; Third Place, $50. The award is to be used for professional improvement that will serve the interests and needs of the recipients.

Purpose

The Florence Hall Award is presented for an outstanding program conducted by one or more NEAFCS members who have been alert in recognizing new concerns and interests of families and have involved people in planning and implementing programs that benefit families.

Eligibility

  1. Application may be submitted by an individual or a team.
  2. Program shall have been conducted within the past five (5) years.

Application

  1. Complete the On-line Awards Application and submit one printed copy.
  2. Program outline-limit to five (5) double-spaced typed pages:
    1. Program description-situation, emphasis, goals, scale / size
    2. New concerns and emerging issues-methods, clientele, rural / urban focus
    3. Resources involved-cooperators, volunteers, special funds
    4. Accomplishments-impact, benefits, number impacted, how measured
    5. Future implications-clientele yet to be served
    6. Other Extension programs conducted within the time span of nominated project (example: these could be other related programs that have come about as a result of programming efforts).
  3. Letter of support from an appropriate state staff or district administrator.
  4. Supplementary materials — limit of five (5) pieces. Please package appropriately for the types of supplemental materials submitted.

Judging Criteria 100 Total Points

  1. Program description — 20 points
  2. New concerns and emerging issues — 25 points
  3. Resources involved — 10 points
  4. Accomplishments — 25 points
  5. Future implications — 10 points
  6. Other Extension programs — 5 points
  7. Support evidence — 5 points

Procedure

  1. Submit one (1) copy of the application package, letter of support, and support materials as listed above for the Florence Hall Award to the appropriate affiliate chair by the affiliate due date.
  2. Affiliate chair will mail the winning application(s) postmarked no later than April 1 to ||VPAwardsFilecard||.

Past Presidents Award for New Professional The award is presented to an outstanding new professional, but must be used to help defray the cost of attending the recipient's first NEAFCS Annual Session. NEAFCS Past Presidents

Background

With a belief in the value of continued professional development, the past presidents of NEAFCS established this award to help enable new professionals to attend their first NEAFCS Annual Session.

Award

One national award of $500 presented annually to an outstanding new professional. The award must be used to help defray the cost of attending the recipient's first NEAFCS Annual Session.

Purpose

  1. To recognize outstanding accomplishments of NEAFCS members within the first three years of employment.
  2. To encourage the use of innovative and effective methods of conducting an Extension program.
  3. To encourage members to participate in NEAFCS and attend Annual Session.

Eligibility

  1. The applicant may not have previously attended NEAFCS Annual Session.
  2. The applicant must be in the first three years from date of employment with Extension Service.
  3. The award recipient must attend the Annual Session where the award is presented. If the recipient is unable to attend the Annual Session, the award is forfeited.
  4. The recipient must be employed in the Cooperative Extension System at the time of the Annual Session when the award is presented.

Application

  1. Complete the On-line Awards Application and submit one printed copy.
  2. Program outline-limit to five (5) double-spaced typed pages.
    1. Introduction of nominee — brief statement of the nominee's professional data.
    2. Program accomplishment — in 200 words or less, summarize most outstanding accomplishments as an Extension employee. Include objectives, goals, methods, results, and evaluation of programs conducted.
    3. Special honors or awards — list any special honors or awards received since beginning Extension employment.
    4. Professional association membership and participation — list current membership in related professional associations. Do not included honorary societies, civic and service clubs.
    5. Statement verifying that the applicant has never attended an Annual Session.
  3. Letter of support from appropriate state staff or district administrator.

Judging Criteria 100 Total Points

  1. Meets qualifications and requirements for award-5 points
  2. Program accomplishments
    1. Meets new concerns and interests of families-20 points
    2. Involves others in planning and implementation-20 points
    3. Provides evidence of initiative, innovative methods and ideas-20 points
    4. Demonstrates results and future implications-20 points
  3. Special honors and awards-5 points
  4. Professional membership and participation-5 points
  5. Preparation of application-5 points

Procedure

  1. Submit one (1) copy of the application package, letter of support, and support materials as listed above for the New Professional Award to the appropriate affiliate chair by the affiliate due date.
  2. Affiliate chair will mail the winning application(s) postmarked no later than April 1 to ||VPAwardsFilecard||.

Para-Professional Award In recognition of outstanding service to special audiences through the use of para-professionals working with or supervised by Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Educators.

Background

This award was implemented in 1970 by the Pennsylvania Association of Extension Home Economists.

Award

One $200 award will be presented to an outstanding para-professional. The para-professional will also receive their complimentary registration to the annual session the year they receive the award.

Purpose

  1. To recognize outstanding accomplishments of para-professionals in Extension Family and Consumer Sciences including youth programs.
  2. To encourage the use of imaginative and effective methods to reach special audiences.
  3. To promote local, state and national recognition of outstanding service to special audiences through the use of para-professionals working with or supervised by Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Educators who are NEAFCS members.

Eligibility

  1. A para-professional is an individual who is an employee of the Cooperative Extension Service and works under the supervision of Extension professionals.
  2. The para-professional must have been employed at least two years or the part-time equivalent of two years in present position and be working with or supervised by an Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Educator who is a member of NEAFCS.
  3. The national award winner is only eligible to win this award once. Regional winners may reapply.
  4. The application form and supporting narrative are to be prepared by the sponsoring Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Educator. However the form must be signed by the applicant (para-professional) as well as the sponsoring agent.
  5. Team entries are not permitted.

Application

  1. Complete the On-line Awards Application and submit one printed copy. (The para-professional is the applicant and the sponsoring Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Educator is the immediate supervisor.)
  2. Attach personal information sheet about sponsoring Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Educator - name, title, business address, business phone, county, state, zip code, number of years in Extension
  3. Program outline - limit to two (2) double-spaced typed pages:
    1. Assigned target audience
    2. Brief statement of program accomplishment.

      Cite specific examples: include how the program serves the needs and interests of families and/or individuals with whom the para-professional works, methods used in carrying out the program and results.

      Include use of volunteer leadership and/or cooperation with other organizations and agencies, if applicable.

  4. Support evidence-limit to one (1) page news story or teaching aid may be attached if applicable (it can be front and back of sheet).
  5. It is encouraged that the national winner attends the annual session the year they receive their honor. Their registration and special event fees will be waived and they are eligible for hosted meals.

Judging Criteria 100 Points Total

  1. Program serves needs - 20 points
  2. Methods used - 40 points
  3. Impact of program - 40 points

Procedure

  1. Submit one (1) copy of the application package and support materials as listed above for the Para-Professional Award to the appropriate affiliate chair by the affiliate due date.
  2. Affiliate chair will mail the winning application(s) postmarked no later than April 1 to:
    Marsha Lockard
    Vice President of Awards and Recognition
    c/o Univ of Idaho Extension, Owyhee County
    238 8th Ave West
    Marsing, ID 83639-5304

Dean Don Felker Financial Management Award This award recognized the development of financial management programs which help individuals and families make decisions and plans for their present and future needs.

Background

This award recognized the development of financial management programs which help individuals and families make decisions and plans for their present and future needs. In 1994, NEAFCS changed the name of this award in memory of Dean Don Felker, a member of the NEAFCS advisory board and Dean of the School of Consumer and Family Sciences, Purdue University, for his outstanding contributions to long-range financial planning for the association.

Award

Two awards are given. First Place is a $200 scholarship to attend the current year Annual Session; Second Place is a $100 scholarship to attend the current year Annual Session.

Purpose

These awards are given to Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Educators who have developed an outstanding educational program on some aspect of family financial management. The program should provide training in budgeting, credit management, savings, selecting financial services, preparing for home ownership, investing, retirement planning or other topics that help individuals and families develop financial management skills.

Eligibility

  1. Application may be submitted by an individual or a team.
  2. Program must have been successfully used by the applicant prior to applying.
  3. National winners will present a Concurrent Session at the Annual Meeting the year the award is received.

Application

  1. Complete the On-line Awards Application and submit one printed copy.
  2. Program outline-limit to five (5) double-spaced typed pages:
    1. Introduction-program objectives, target audience defined
    2. Program description-content, delivery methods described, materials developed
    3. Program impact-evaluation methods, results/impacts, visibility
  3. Supplementary materials-limit of five (5) pieces. Please package appropriately for the types of supplemental materials submitted.

Judging Criteria 100 Points Total

  1. Introduction — 20 points
  2. Program description — 35 points
  3. Program impact — 35 points
  4. Supporting Materials — 10 points

Procedure

  1. Submit one (1) copy of the application package and support materials as listed above for the Dean Don Felker Financial Management Award to the appropriate affiliate chair by the affiliate due date.
  2. Affiliate chair will mail the winning application(s) postmarked no later than April 1 to ||VPAwardsFilecard||.

Mary W. Wells Memorial Diversity Award This award recognizes outstanding efforts and accomplishments of individuals and/or teams in diversity and pluralism for any Extension Family and Consumer Sciences program or activity, including staff development, advisory councils, programs, etc.

Background

The Mary W. Wells Memorial Diversity Award is presented in support of the Cooperative Extension System's emphasis on diversity and pluralism -- a national program to respond to the changing work force, population and Extension audience. Contributions to diversity for the association and profession by Mary Wells, NEAFCS Past President, were recognized in 1996, when NEAFCS named the diversity award in her memory.

Diversity is defined as differences among people with respect to age, class, ethnicity, gender, physical and mental abilities, race, sexual orientation, spiritual practice and other human differences. Pluralismis defined as an organizational culture that incorporates mutual respect, acceptance, teamwork and productivity among people who are diverse in the dimensions of human differences listed above as diversity.

Award

One award of $500 will be provided by a fund of contributions from individuals and affiliate associations. The award is to be used by the recipient or team to further develop skills and/or programs in diversity and pluralism.

Purpose

The purpose of this award is to recognize outstanding efforts and accomplishments of individuals and/or teams in diversity and pluralism for any Extension Family and Consumer Sciences program or activity, including staff development, advisory councils, programs, etc.

The objectives of a diversity effort or program are:

  1. To provide relevant educational programs to an increasingly diverse population
  2. To encourage members of diverse groups to become more involved and influential in all aspects of Extension Family and Consumer Sciences programs, especially in leadership, key decision making and program planning
  3. To reflect the interests and contributions of diverse people in Extension program planning, program implementation and leadership roles
  4. To recognize outstanding professionals who have made significant efforts in the areas of diversity and pluralism

Eligibility

  1. Application may be submitted by an individual or a team.
  2. The program or activity shall have been conducted within the past year.
  3. National winner will present a concurrent session or participate in the Showcase of Excellence at Annual Session the year the award is received.

Application

  1. Complete the On-line Awards Application and submit one printed copy.
  2. Program outline -- limit to five (5) double-spaced typed pages:
    1. Program accomplishments-briefly describe your significant accomplishments in an introductory paragraph. It is suggested that one program be selected for the application.
    2. Identify the issues or reasons for the effort-describe timeliness, importance and significance. Define objectives and purpose and relate how they were developed. Identify and describe target audience.
    3. Program description-design of program, locations, methods used to foster environment that respects and values diversity and pluralism, innovative/creative approach, involvement of others in planning and implementation, time frame
    4. Accomplishments-impacts, obstacles overcome, benefits, numbers affected, qualitative results, evaluation notes, contributions to FCS/CES diversity and pluralism efforts
    5. Future implications-expansion, changes, application for other local, state or national programs
    6. Plan for use of award money-description of plans to further develop skills and/or programs in diversity and pluralism and who will be involved.
  3. Letter of support from appropriate state staff or district administrator
  4. Supplementary material is limited to five (5) pieces. Please package appropriately for the types of supplemental materials submitted.

Judging Criteria 100 Points Total

  1. Identify the issues or reasons for the effort - 20 points
  2. P Program Excellence Through Research Award This award emphasizes the use of research results to improve existing programs or to develop new programs.

    Background

    This award is to recognize NEAFCS members as both researchers and users of research. This award emphasizes the use of research results to improve existing programs or to develop new programs.

    Award

    One award of $500 will be given.

    Eligibility

    1. Application may be submitted by an individual or a team.
    2. Research shall have been conducted in the past three (3) years.
    3. Applicant must be willing to present the research in a concurrent session for Annual Session the year award is received. If a team application, at least one member of team must be willing to present the research.

    Application

    1. Complete the On-line Awards Application and submit one printed copy.
    2. Abstract-150 words or less summarizing the research
    3. Synopsis-800 words or less depicting the use of study results to strengthen Extension programs. Include scientific research method, methodology and a review of the literature. References separate from 800 word synopsis.

    Judging Criteria 100 Points Total

    1. Address critical concerns of Extension Family and Consumer Sciences applicable to Extension teaching- 15 points
    2. Used accepted research methods/results presented objectively-30 points
    3. Findings used to strengthen Extension teaching and/or program development-25 points
    4. Conclusions and implications substantiated by results-20 points
    5. Clarity of presentation/readability (applications exceeding word limit will be penalized)-10 points

    Procedure

    1. Submit one (1) copy of the application package and support materials as listed above for the Program Excellence Through Research Award to the appropriate affiliate chair by the affiliate due date.
    2. Affiliate chair will mail the winning application(s) postmarked no later than April 1 to ||VPAwardsFilecard||.

    Environmental Education Award This award recognizes NEAFCS members for outstanding educational programs conducted for families and/or communities on various environmental issues/concerns.

    Background

    As environmental education is a major Extension program focus, the Environmental Education Award recognizes NEAFCS members for outstanding educational programs conducted for families and/or communities on various environmental issues/concerns.

    Award

    One award of a $200 scholarship to attend the current year Annual Session will be awarded to a Family and Consumer Sciences individual or team.

    Purpose

    The Environmental Education Award is presented for an outstanding program conducted by an individual or team who have been involved in educating families on issues concerning water quality, air quality, recycling, and natural resource conservation.

    Eligibility

    1. Application may be submitted by an individual or a team.
    2. The program or activity shall have been conducted in the past three years.
    3. National winner will present a concurrent session or participate in the Showcase of Excellence at Annual Meeting the year award is received.

    Application

    1. Complete the On-line Awards Application and submit one printed copy.
    2. Program Outline — limit to five (5) double-spaced typed pages.
      1. Introduction — program objectives, target audience described
      2. Program description — content, delivery methods described, material developed
      3. Program impact — evaluation methods, results/impacts, marketing publicity
    3. Supporting material — limit to five (5) pieces. Please package appropriately for the types of supplemental materials submitted.

    Judging Criteria 100 Points Total

    1. Introduction — 20 points
    2. Program description and Accomplishments — 35 points
    3. Program impact — 35 points
    4. Supporting Materials — 10 points

    Procedure

    1. Submit one (1) copy of the application package and support materials as listed above for the Environmental Education Award to the appropriate affiliate chair by the affiliate due date.
    2. Affiliate chair will mail the winning application(s) postmarked no later than April 1 to ||VPAwardsFilecard||.

    Early Childhood Child Care Training Award This award recognizes outstanding childcare professional training that addresses the needs of young children, birth to eight years of age.

    Background

    The Ohio Affiliate of NEAFCS is pleased to sponsor this award in the area of early child care education to recognize outstanding child care professional training that addresses the needs of young children, birth to eight years of age. This award is in memory of Anita Pulay, an Ohio Extension Educator who recognized the positive outcomes of investing in children.

    Award

    One (1) award of $500 will be presented to an individual or team.

    Eligibility

    1. Application can be submitted by an individual or team member.
    2. The program must have been successfully conducted by the applicant within two years prior to applying for the award.
    3. The application must contain a marketing and delivery piece.
    4. The winner will participate in the Showcase of Excellence at the Annual Meeting the year the award is received.

    Application

    1. Complete the On-line Awards Application and submit one printed copy.
    2. Program Outline - limit to five (5) double-spaced typed pages
      1. Program Description - situation, emphasis, goals
      2. Concerns and Issues - clientele, rural/urban focus
      3. Resources Involved - cooperators, special funds
      4. Accomplishments - impacts, benefits, number impacted, how measured
      5. Future Implications
    3. Supporting materials not to exceed 5 pieces

    Judging Criteria 100 Points Total

    1. Introduction - program objectives, target audience defined, topic is training the early childcare professional - 20 points
    2. Program Accomplishments - content appropriate, evidence the program is serving the current needs and interests of families, delivery method described, creativity, initiative, and innovative methods, quality of materials - 50 points
    3. Program Impact - evaluation method, evidence of impact on childcare professionals and/or community, future implications - 30 points

    Procedure

    1. Submit one (1) copy of the application package and support materials as listed above for the Early Childhood Education Award to the appropriate affiliate chair by the affiliate due date.
    2. Affiliate chair will mail the winning application(s) postmarked no later than April 1 to:
      Marsha Lockard
      Vice President of Awards and Recognition
      c/o Univ of Idaho Extension, Owyhee County
      238 8th Ave West
      Marsing, ID 83639-5304

    Food Safety Award In recognition of NEAFCS members for outstanding educational programs conducted for families, school nutrition workers, food industry employees or managers, church workers preparing meals, home care providers, and other groups/individuals preparing and/or serving food. University of Nebraska - Lincoln Extension

    Background

    Food safety is a major Extension program focus. University of Nebraska Cooperative Extension sponsors this award to recognize NEAFCS members for outstanding educational programs conducted for families, school nutrition workers, food industry employees or managers, church workers preparing meals, home care providers, and other groups/individuals preparing and/or serving food. As a leader in food safety education, University of Nebraska Cooperative Extension wants to help recognize others who have innovative programs from which NEAFCS members can learn and enhance their food safety education programs.

    Award

    One (1) $500 award will be presented to a Family and Consumer Sciences individual or team. The monetary award is to be used for professional development by the recipient or team to further develop their skills or to develop additional educational curriculum in the area of food safety.

    Purpose

    The food safety award is presented for an outstanding educational program conducted by one or more NEAFCS members which have been innovative in developing, delivering and/or determining the impact of a food safety program that makes a difference. The use of technology as a learning tool will be an important criteria in the selection of this award recipient.

    Eligibility

    1. Application may be submitted by an individual or a team.
    2. The program or activity should have been conducted in the past three years.
    3. National winner will present a concurrent session or participate in the Showcase of Excellence at Annual Session the year the award is received.

    Application

    1. Complete the On-line Awards Application and submit one printed copy.
    2. Program outline - limit to five (5) double-spaced typed pages.
      1. Introduction - program objectives, target audience described
      2. Program description - content, delivery methods described, materials developed
      3. Program impact - evaluation methods, results/impacts, marketing and publicity
    3. Supporting material - limit to five (5) pieces. Please package appropriately for the types of supplemental materials submitted.

    Judging Criteria 100 Points Total

    1. Introduction - 20 points
    2. Program accomplishments - 35 points
    3. Program impact - 35 points
    4. Supporting Materials - 10 points

    Procedure

    1. Submit one (1) copy of the application package and support materials as listed above for the Food Safety Award to the appropriate affiliate chair by the affiliate due date.
    2. Affiliate chair will mail the winning application(s) postmarked no later than April 1 to ||VPAwardsFilecard||.

    Communications Awards Estabilished in 1972 to encourage excellence in communications. American Income Life Insurance Company

    Background

    To encourage excellence in communications, the Communications Awards began in 1972. American Income Life Insurance Company began sponsorship for the Communications Awards in 1981 and increased sponsorship in 1995. In 1999, the Communications Awards were revised to reflect the communications methods and technology used by NEAFCS members.

    Award

    In each of the eight Communications Awards categories, a first, second, and third place national winner is selected. All national winners receive certificates of recognition. Monetary awards are presented to the first, second and third place national winners in each category. First place winners receive $200, second place winners receive $100, and third place winners receive $50.

    Eligibility

    The communications programs shall have been conducted within the past two (2) years. Application may be submitted by an individual or a team.

    Application

    1. Complete the On-line Awards Application and submit one printed copy.
    2. Program outline - limit to five (5) double-spaced typed or printed pages, to include:
      1. Category
      2. Subject / issue
      3. Target audience
      4. Where program has been used
      5. Number of people reached
      6. Impact on participants / clientele / audience
      7. Resources used (other agencies, businesses, volunteer leaders, special funds, etc.)
      8. Percentage of the information written / prepared by applicant
      9. Indicate information from university and / or USDA sources
      10. Indicate how Extension Service is identified
    3. Supplementary materials - submit the documentation required for respective category. (For AWARD CATEGORIES - refer to Communications.)

    General Application Process above, see below for specific media.

    Newsletters

    Three (3) different issues of an educational newsletter written for either a general or specific audience. Newsletter may be for special educational effort or regular Extension program. Any method of printing may be used. Newsletter may be prepared for distribution through envelope mailing or as a self-mailer. Newsletter must be printed off - applications directing the judge to a website for a pdf file will be disqualified. Put on-line award application, program outline, and newsletters in three prong report folder with clear cover.

    Written Press Releases

    (Formerly Written News) - A press release or a special feature story or a personal column. Send a copy of the original as submitted to the newspaper or magazine, plus proof of publication. Do not send more than one article. Put on-line award application, program outline, and supplemental materials in three prong report folder with clear cover. Abstracts for journals not acceptable.

    Radio

    An educational or a promotional feature from one (1) minute to 15 minutes in length. May be a regular broadcast, series of P.S.A.'s with a theme, or a special program. Submit on a recordable CD - DVD or cassette tape labeled with name, address, and counter number if feature is not at beginning of tape. Indicate length of feature. Use high quality (new) tapes or CD-DVD's. Place in small cassette tape box for protection or CDRom case. Put on-line award application and program outline in three prong report folder with clear cover with the Radio Spot securely placed in a plastic sleeve with closed top or connected to the back page of the folder with adhesive strip. This prevents the Radio Spot from becoming lost from the application materials.

    Television

    An educational or promotional feature from one (1) minute to 30 minutes in length. May b Marketing Package Award Recognizes NEAFCS members for outstanding marketing efforts addressing concerns and needs of children, families or communities.

    Background

    The Marketing Package Award recognizes NEAFCS members for outstanding marketing efforts addressing concerns and needs of children, families or communities.

    Award

    One award of a $200 scholarship to attend the current year Annual Session will be granted to an individual or team.

    Purpose

    The Marketing Package Award is presented to Family and Consumer Sciences Educators for the development of an outstanding marketing package promoting a class, program or pertinent Family and Consumer Sciences issues.

    Eligibility

    1. Application may be submitted by an individual or a team.
    2. Marketing effort must have been successfully used by the applicant(s) within the past three years.
    3. The application must contain three or more of the following marketing pieces: brochure, flyer, news release, radio spots, exhibit or photograph.
    4. The winner will participate in the Showcase of Excellence at the Annual Meeting the year the award is received.

    Application

    1. Complete the On-line Awards Application and submit one printed copy.
    2. Program outline — limit to five (5) double-spaced typed pages.
      1. Identify the issues or reasons for effort
      2. Target audience
      3. Where marketing efforts were used
      4. Number of people reached
      5. Marketing accomplishments
      6. How Extension Service is identified
    3. Supplementary materials — Submit the documentation required for each category included. (for example — actual flyer, radio spot, picture of exhibit, etc.) Please package appropriately for the types of supplemental materials submitted. See suggestions under Communication Awards for specific supplementary materials. Put all materials securely in a three prong folder or binder.

    Brochure or Flyer — Send a copy of the brochure or flyer.

    News Release — A special feature for newspaper promoting the effort. Send a copy of the original as submitted to the newspaper or magazine, along with proof of publication. A "hard copy" of electronically-transferred copy can be submitted.

    Radio Spot — A single spot announcement not more than 60 seconds in length. Submit on a cassette tape labeled with name address, and counter number if feature is not at beginning of tape.

    Exhibit — Send a picture of the exhibit with a description of all components of the exhibit.

    Photograph — Send the original photograph not more than 8 x 10 inches in size. If the photograph appeared in newspaper or magazine, send it in as it appeared with proof of publication.

    Judging Criteria 100 Points Total

    1. Issues or reasons for effort — 30 points
    2. Accomplishments — 30 points
    3. Supplementary materials — 40 points

    Procedure

    1. Submit one (1) copy of the application package and support materials as listed above for the Marketing Package Award to the appropriate affiliate chair by the affiliate due date.
    2. Affiliate chair will mail the winning application(s) postmarked no later than April 1 to ||VPAwardsFilecard||.

    Community Partnership Award Recognizes NEAFCS members for outstanding community partnership efforts in meeting the needs of families through collaboration with group, agencies and consumers.

    Background

    As collaborative work is encouraged at all levels of Cooperative Extension, the Community Partnership Award recognizes NEAFCS members for outstanding community partnership efforts in meeting the needs of families through collaboration with group, agencies and consumers.

    Award

    Two awards given for the collaborative efforts of a NEAFCS member or team of NEAFCS members with one or more groups or agencies in an educational effort to plan, coordinate and implement programs that benefit families. First Place is a $200 scholarship to attend the current year Annual Session; Second Place is a $100 scholarship to attend the current year Annual Session.

    Purpose

    The Community Partnership Award recognizes NEAFCS members for their efforts in building community partnerships to meet the educational needs and/or concerns of families.

    Eligibility

    1. Application may be submitted by a NEAFCS member or a team of NEAFCS members.
    2. The community partnership effort shall have been conducted within the past three years.
    3. National winner will present a concurrent session at the Annual Session the year the award is received.

    Application

    1. Complete the On-line Awards Application and submit one printed copy.
    2. Program outline — limit to five (5) double-spaced typed pages.
      1. Description of community partnership
      2. Program description
      3. Accomplishments / Impacts
      4. Role of NEAFCS applicant(s) in partnership
      5. Future implications
      6. Plan for use of award money
    3. Two letters of support from consumers, Extension faculty, or agencies describing impact of community partnership on families.
    4. Supporting material — limit to five (5) pieces. Please package appropriately for the types of supplemental materials submitted. See suggestions under Communication Awards for specific supplementary materials. Put all materials securely in a three prong folder or binder.

    Judging Criteria 100 Points Total

    1. Description of community partnership — 10 points
    2. Program description — 20 points
    3. Accomplishments/Impacts — 20 points
    4. Role of member(s) — 15 points
    5. Future implications — 15 points
    6. Plan for use of award money — 10 points
    7. Support evidence — 10 points

    Procedure

    1. Submit one (1) copy of the application package, letters of support, and support materials as listed above for the Community Partnership Award to the appropriate affiliate chair by the affiliate due date.
    2. Affiliate chair will mail the winning application(s) postmarked no later than April 1 to ||VPAwardsFilecard||.

    Extension Housing Outreach Award Recognizes NEAFCS members for outstanding housing educational programs conducted for families and/or communities. Montana State University Extension and the Housing Education and Research Association (HERA)

    Background

    Housing education is a major emphasis of Extension programming. The "Extension Housing Outreach Award" was established by Montana State University Extension Housing Program to recognize NEAFCS members for outstanding housing educational programs conducted for families and / or communities. This award is co-sponsored by the Extension Section of the Housing Education and Research Association.

    Award

    Three (3) $300 national awards will be awarded to Family and Consumer Sciences county professionals. The monetary award is to be used by the recipient to further develop Extension housing programs.

    Purpose

    This recognition honors outstanding Extension System programming which enhances housing outreach to communities and special need families. Housing program areas that can be recognized include: universal design education, home buyer education, energy efficiency and weatherization education, home environmental quality education, equity protection education, housing public policy education, and special needs housing for the aging population, Native American, migrant workers and families with language barriers.

    Eligibility

    1. Application may be submitted by an individual or a collaborative team.
    2. The outreach program or activity shall have been conducted by a County Extension Professional / Agent and implemented at the county local / level.
    3. The outreach program or activity shall have been conducted in the past two years.
    4. National winners will participate in the Showcase of Excellence at Annual Session the year the award is received.

    Application

    1. Complete the On-line Awards Application and submit one printed copy.
    2. Program Outline - limit to four (4) double-spaced typed pages
      1. Introduction - purpose, goal and objectives, target audience reached
      2. Program Description - content and materials, partnerships, leadership capacity, unique delivery methods
      3. Program Impact - evaluation methods, results / impacts, transferability, marketing publicity
  3. Supporting materials - program materials, photos, curriculum package examples, marketing materials - not to exceed 10 pieces. Please package appropriately for the types of supplemental materials submitted. See suggestions under Communication Awards for specific supplementary materials. Put all materials securely in a three prong folder or binder.

Judging Criteria 100 Points Total

  1. Introduction - 20 points
  2. Program Description - shows evidence that program is meeting the needs and interest of the families / and communities being served - 40 points:
    1. Content of program - 15 points
    2. Partnerships - evidence of collaborations with other Extension workers as well as other agencies or organizations involved with housing - 10 points
    3. Leadership capacity - evidence that the Extension Service has provided the leadership to establish, implement, and evaluate the housing initiative - 10 points
    4. Unique Delivery Methods - evidence of using unique outreach methods to implement program, follow-up with program participants and document impacts of program - 5 points
  3. Program Impact - evidence that the program met goal and objectives of effort and made a difference in lives of families and / or communities. Impact measures may include adoption of practices, behavior changes, money / energy saved, reduction of risks, etc. - 25 points
  4. Program Transferability - evidence that program and support materials can easil Award Sponsors

    American Income Life Insurance Company

    NEAFCS Communications Awards for Newsletters, Radio, Television, Written Press Releases, Educational Technology, Educational Curriculum Package, Educational Publications, Internet Education Technology

    Montana State University Extension Housing Program AND The Housing Education and Research Association

    Extension Housing Outreach Award

    NEAFCS Members

    Plaques for NEAFCS Distinguished Service & Continued Excellence Awards
    Greenwood Fellowship
    Grace Frysinger Fellowship
    Distinguished Service Award
    Continued Excellence Award
    Extension Educator of the Year (sponsored by the 2010 Affiliate Presidents)
    Florence Hall Award
    Dean Don Felker Financial Management Award
    Program Excellence in Research Award
    Early Childhood Child Care Training (sponsored by the 2010 National Board)
    Environmental Education Award
    Marketing Package Award
    Community Partnership Award
    Healthy Lifestyles Education Grant

    NEAFCS Past Presidents

    New Professional Award

    NEAFCS State / Territory Affiliates & NEAFCS Awards Foundation

    Mary W. Wells Memorial Diversity Award

    University of Nebraska Cooperative Extension

    Food Safety Award

    American Cleaning Institute

    Clean Homes . . . Safe and Healthy Families Award

    NEAFCS Greenwood Fellowship

    2010

    Sara Jenkins (Kentucky)

    Brooke Jenkins is pursuing a doctoral degree in family studies from the University of Kentucky. Her research interest is relationships between social capital and rural economically challenged families and women.

    2009

    Roxie Rodgers Dinstel (Alaska)

    Roxie Rodgers Dinstel is examining the Individual's Expenditure of the Alaska Permanent Fund Dividend to earn a PhD in Family Economics from the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

    2008

    Kajuandra Harris Huntley (Alabama)

    2007

    Lisa Tucker Gilmore (Arkansas)

    Health plays an integral role in quality of life, especially when there is a lack of it. This award will be used to pursue a Doctorate in Public Health Leadership from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, better equipping her to help Arkansans improve quality of life and wellbeing.

    2006

    Sharon Louise McDonald (Pennsylvania)

    Advances in web-based technology for distance education must be implemented and embraced by Extension to continue to fulfill its mission. Her master's research paper will examine current use of technological tools in Extension program delivery, knowledge, beliefs and attitudes of Extension Educators about these tools and implementation in program delivery.

    2005

    Ana H. Marty Alicea (Puerto Rico)

    Ana is a doctoral candidate at FSU in Human Sciences, Child Development emphasis. Her dissertation will examine child attachment and its correlates emphasizing in ethnic differences and the role of non-parental caregivers. Implications for parenting education, training, and policy will be derived. Her research will be relevant for Extension Educators.

    2004

    Jan F. Scholl (Pennsylvania)

    During this fellowship, Jan Scholl will conduct research to create a video documentary of Extension FCS history and a book about Martha Van Rennselear, Extension FCS pioneer. Four weeks travel is planned to Archives II, near College Park, Maryland and to the Cornell University Archives in Ithaca, New York.

    2003

    None

    2002

    Ana Helga Marty (Puerto Rico)

    As a Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, I'm certain that studying a Doctoral Degree in Child Development will be an enriching learning experience. My goal is to contribute with my knowledge and experience to improve and transform the quality of life for our children, families, and country.

    2001

    Doris Herringshaw (Ohio)

    This award will be used to pursue a Doctoral Degree in Leadership and Policy Studies from Bowling Green State University to increase her ability and effectiveness as an Extension professional and community member.

    1998

    Dawn Koger (Michigan)

    Dawn Koger, Wayne County, Michigan, is a doctoral candidate in Human Ecology at Michigan State University. Her emphasis is Family Studies, with a minor in program evaluation. Her dissertation will examine the extent to which locus of control is influenced in limited resource women who participate in a home visitation, parent education program.

    Nancy E. Grotevant (Pennsylvania)

    Striving to provide programming that will support the increasing number of aging persons in Pennsylvania, Nancy has focused her educational efforts in health education concentrating in gerontology. By joining these areas she will be better able to serve, not only her county and region, but all counties in Pennsylvania.

    NEAFCS Grace Frysinger Fellowship

    2009

    Susan Hansen (Nebraska)

    Susan Hansen will be traveling to Oregon State Extension to gather ideas for recruiting, teaching and evaluating to enhance her work with SNAP-Ed and the 4-H youth program.

    2008

    Linda Block (Arizona)

    2007

    Kathleen Roesel Byrnes (Kentucky)

    In an effort to reach more of the 150,000+ citizens of Kenton County, Kentucky, Kathy utilized this grant for expenses incurred while visiting Extension personnel in Nebraska and other states to learn first hand how to design a better web education effort and manage it on a regular basis.

    2006

    Cassandra Sue Corridon (Maryland)

    The MCE mentoring plan was developed to partner new employees with tenured, experienced faculty. The Grace Frysinger Grant will provide Corridon, the first Mentoring Coordinator, with the opportunity to visit states with established mentoring programs and use that experience to develop, improve and expand the fledgling MCE Mentoring Program.

    2003

    Yvonne Steinbring (California)

    This fellowship will be used to develop a curriculum for Master Clothing Volunteers and others to teach the use of post-consumer textiles and clothing to make high quality items. Thrift shops or persons wanting to start businesses utilizing textile and clothing waste could use this curriculum.

    2002

    Pamela B. C. Kutara (Hawaii)

    Pamela Kutara would like to improve her knowledge and skills in Extension program evaluation by traveling to Arizona to work with Dr. Sherry Betts at the University of Arizona. She would like to focus on studying methodologies to retrieve outcome data especially with culturally diverse, limited resource audiences.

    2001

    Nannette C. Armstrong (Illinois)

    Missouri featured its Telecommunications Community Resource Centers at the National Extension Technology Conference in 1998. What if University of Illinois Extension would adapt that model? Nann Armstrong proposes to study utilization of the TRCs as part of a proposed study leave exploring distance learning.

    1998

    Marilyn Cross Bischoff (Idaho)

    To increase Extension outreach to southwest Idaho's growing Hispanic population Marilyn will participate in a Spanish language immersion program and meet with FCS educators and professionals in Costa Rica. Marilyn will complete a descriptive study of Latino financial practices. She will collaborate with local groups to expand Extension financial management programming for Hispanic families.

    Distinguished Service Award — Central Region

    2010

    Cheri Burcham (Illinois)

    Cheri's focus on older adults and aging is evident in the number of state curriculum she has co-authored with family life team educators and her involvement in caregiver self-management programs.

    Melinda Daily (Kansas)

    For the past 12 years Melinda has been working in her District to build community partnerships to meet educational needs and concerns of families through leadership and other program efforts.

    Darlene Decker (Indiana)

    Darlene has taught Professor Popcorn Exploring MyPyramid to 1500 youth which has assisted them in making healthy food choices and being active.

    Suzanne Driessen (Minnesota)

    Suzanne Driessen, University of Minnesota Extension food safety educator, noted for developing creative interactive tools like the Food Safety Wheel, Serve It Up Safely online course and Food Safety display.

    Nancy Frecks (Nebraska)

    Nancy Frecks' Extension career began in 1998, teaching life skills to low income audiences through grant funded programs. In 2005 she began providing leadership and FCS programming in 4 counties.

    Julie Garden-Robinson (North Dakota)

    Julie Garden-Robinson has been a food and nutrition specialist at North Dakota State University since 1995. She does programming and materials development in the area of nutrition and food safety.

    Cheryl Jacobs (South Dakota)

    Cheryl's work in community leadership development has helped several small towns launch community gardens, farmer's markets, food pantries, thrift stores and other projects to improve the lives of South Dakotans.

    Maude Kelly (Missouri)

    Maude Kelly's focus is on all aspects of human development programming. She has successfully networked with local agencies and organizations to provide quality educational programs that will help strengthen families.

    Marilyn Kooiker (Wisconsin)

    Burnett County, Wisconsin, need for food insecurity education developed into a Hunger Task Force which led to continuity and cohesiveness with direction from Marilyn Kooiker, Family Living Agent.

    Monadine Mattey (Ohio)

    2010 marks the 25th anniversary of Extension work for Monadine Mattey, Extension Educator Family and Consumer Sciences Pike/Scioto County Ohio. Areas of impact include diabetes, healthy eating and exercise.

    Joyce Shriner (Ohio)

    Joyce Shriner is the Family and Consumer Sciences Educator and Director for Ohio State University Extension, Hocking County. A 14 year member of NEAFCS, she specializes in family life education.

    Mary Sullivan (Kansas)

    In the eleven years Mary has worked in Grant County, she has built collaborations with the school district and has expanded her grants to serve the Hispanic and low-income populations.

    Georgia Wagner (Indiana)

    The Caring for the Caregiver workshop is a daylong event to nurture, enhance skills and attitudes and enlighten of community resources for individuals in care-giving roles.

    2009

    Kimberly Asche (Minnesota)

    Kim's special program emphases has been healthy lifestyle and nutrition. She shares her Extension compassion and leadership skills in programs designed for use statewide with both youth and adult audiences.

    Lisa Barlage (Ohio)

    Health programming has become the focus of Lisa Barlage's Extension career. She works closely with local Ross County collaboratives to provide healthy programs and resources, especially to limited income families.

    Nancy Brooks (Wisconsin)

    Nancy Brooks has focused on program development and evaluation capacity building with Family Living colleagues. She has also included development of resources used by all program areas for evaluating outcomes.

    Maureen Burson (Nebraska)

    Bonnie Tazewell has served as an extension educa Distinguished Service Award — Southern Region

    2010

    Marsha Blair (Texas)

    Marsha Blair, in her Extension Career, has had exemplary FCS programming, in Diabetes Education, Food Safety and Childhood Obesity. She has held District offices and two State offices during her tenure.

    Donna Bradley (Tennessee)

    Donna manages a county 4-H program of over 50 clubs with emphasis on developing leadership, citizenship, and communication skills. Annually, she involves over 200 youth in regional and state events.

    Debra Garrard-Foster (Oklahoma)

    Over twenty years Debra has focused on providing quality programming and leadership to state-wide formally evaluated projects targeting disadvantaged families while increasing FCS program grants by over one million dollars.

    Wendi Green (Texas)

    With a strong commitment to helping others lead healthier lives, Wendi Green has provided quality educational programs to diverse audiences through Texas AgriLife Extension Service in Freestone and Cherokee Counties.

    Lisa Jordan (Georgia)

    Focusing on EFNEP and Child/Family issues Lisa has been actively involved in professional development opportunities, served in leadership roles and engaged in staff development; receiving numerous awards for her programming.

    Natasha Lucas (Kentucky)

    Natasha has served as County Extension Agent for Family & Consumer Sciences for 13 years. Her focus has been to educate community members on nutrition and health related issues.

    Eleanor Mathews (Alabama)

    Eleanor Mathews has been a member of NEAFCS for twenty-five years. Nationally she has served as Southern Region Director, on committees and as co-liaison for the 2009 Annual Session.

    Judith O'Bryan (Kentucky)

    Cooperative Extension saves the city thousands of dollars by teaching businesses and local residents basic recyling through a train the trainer program.

    Michelle Parrott (Tennessee)

    Focusing on Financial Education Classes, Home-buying Seminars and Health and Safety Programming allows me to serve the county clientele proving a positive impact on our communities.

    Martha Perkins (Kentucky)

    The Mental Healthiness and Aging Initiative is an educational and social marketing program created to increase knowledge of mental health issues and to reduce the stigma associated with these issues.

    Thelma Sanders-Hunter (Tennessee)

    Thelma Sanders-Hunter has worked in Cooperative Extension for 17 years. Her programs focus on Care-giving Education and working with incarcerated parents. She serves as the Tennessee 1890 FCS program leader.

    Elizabeth Shephard (Florida)

    The Superhand project for Brevard County fought against the spread of germs through handwashing efforts. This successful program contributes to Elizabeth Shephard as a Distinguished Extension Agent.

    Julie Diane Smith (Texas)

    Julie focused programming on rural health and wellness due to lacking health care services in the rural county she serves through innovative programs on nutrition, disease prevention and lifestyle changes.

    Cristin Sprenger (Virginia)

    Cristin Sprenger has strived to provide families in her area with educational opportunities to improve their lives. She is an enthusiastic team player and dedicated member of her profession.

    Patty Swearingen (Mississippi)

    Patty has worked over 18 years with all types of Extension Programming. She works enthusiastically with volunteers, farmers, county officials, and community agencies to integrate Extension programs in her county.

    Lani Vasconcellos (Oklahoma)

    Since 1995 Lani Vasconcellos has been dedicated to developing programs, projects, and in-services that support co-workers in delivering effective educational experiences to a variety of Extension audiences.

    Brenda Williams (Florida)

    Dr Distinguished Service Award — Eastern Region

    2010

    Jennifer Bentlejewski (Maryland)

    Lives were changed in Western Maryland through the efforts of this educator who focused on diabetes and chronic disease prevention. In addition, she initiated a statewide FCS web-based evaluation system.

    Lynn James (Pennsylvania)

    The Distinguished Service Award is presented to Lynn James for her accomplishments in leadership, research, publications and educational impact with Penn State Extension, including the multi-award winning Family Fitness program.

    Margaret Miltenberger (West Virginia)

    Leadership for family and consumer sciences involves the local, state and national levels. Areas of program excellence include child care education, diabetes education, literacy, volunteer development and 4H youth development.

    Diane Whitten (New York)

    As a Nutrition Resource Educator for Cornell University Cooperative Extension Diane has provided quality educational programs, and held district and state level leadership positions within NEAFCS, and received numerous awards.

    Nancy Wiker (Pennsylvania)

    Nancy's program focus is food safety and women's health. She is a ServSafe Instructor and teaches food safety to non-profit groups. Nancy is a StrongWomen Ambassador, providing leadership for StrongWomen.

    2009

    Ann Gifford (New York)

    Ann Gifford, Program Team Coordinator for Cornell Cooperative Extension Tompkins County, has many years experience with Extension. Ann is recognized for developing and implementing new initiatives both locally and statewide.

    Robin Kuleck (Pennsylvania)

    Extension Educator Robin L. Kuleck thrives on accepting and conquering challenges of providing family financial management education collaboratively with area agencies to residents in four rural northcentral Pennsylvania counties.

    Carolyn Wissenbach (Pennsylvania)

    Carolyn Wissenbach is the Family Living Educator in Greene County, Pennsylvania presenting programs on food safety, nutrition, health and financial management. Currently she serves as NEAFCS Eastern Region Director.

    2008

    Robert J. Thee (Pennsylvania)

    Luanne J. Hughes (New Jersey)

    Frances Fonner Alloway (Pennsylvania)

    2007

    Linda Kay Davis (West Virginia)

    Kay Davis contributed significantly to chronic disease prevention and nutrition education programs in West Virginia focusing on diabetes, senior wellness, family cardiac education and food safety. She has served in a variety of leadership positions in her state organization as well as extension center committees.

    Mary Reistetter Ehret (Pennsylvania)

    Mary Reistetter Ehret, an Educator and Supervisor for Penn State Nutrition Links, recognizes the importance of professional development to remain current and effective when teaching research based information. She enlightens and excites nutrition education advisors to reach limited resourced families and older adults with the message of good nutrition.

    Marilou Rochford (New Jersey)

    Marilou Rochford, associate professor with Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is family and community health sciences educator for Rutgers Cooperative Extension. She has created numerous innovative programs, provided leadership in her community and state, most recently chairing the Children's Health Summit: Fighting Back Against Childhood Obesity statewide project.

    2006

    Marilyn A. Corbin (Pennsylvania)

    As Associate Director and State Program Leader, Marilyn Corbin provides effective administrative leadership forming program partnerships leading to enhanced state and national funding for extension family and consumer science programs — especially for nutrition, health and youth development. Marilyn is a dedicated extension professional who strives for e Distinguished Service Award — Western Region

    2010

    Gisele Jefferson (Colorado)

    Gisele Jefferson, FCS/4-H agent 29 years in Colorado State Extension - Golden Plains Area, key programs include Nutrition, Diabetes Health Fair, Strong People Stay Healthy, Healthier Weigh, and Money Talk.

    Kelly Knight (New Mexico)

    Kelly began her Extension career in 1999 with NMSU. Her focus has been to provide significant educational programs that improve the quality of life for individuals, families, and communities.

    Lynn Paul (Montana)

    Education and research areas include nutrition, physical activity, and food safety, including Strong Women. She is a PI for a NRI/AFRI childhood obesity prevention grant aimed at parents of 4-H.

    Joey Peutz (Idaho)

    Joey Peutz has spent her career working on behalf of youth and families. She has developed, taught, and evaluated nutrition and food safety programs for adults and children in Idaho.

    Ellen Serfustini (Utah)

    As an Associate Professor and 4-H/FCS agent for USU, Ellen supervises nutrition, mentoring, and youth programs and teaches finance in her county. She has also co-authored curricula in these areas.

    2009

    Martha Raidl (Idaho)

    Martha has been the University of Idaho Extension Nutrition Education Specialist for almost 11 years.

    Joanne Roueche (Utah)

    Joanne Roueche has been very successful in obtaining grant funding and creating new and innovative programs. Her work with Military youth has won NEAFCS National awards national recognition from the Air Force.

    Denise Seilstad (Montana)

    Serves as Family and Consumer Science Extension Agent. Some areas of programming include, Powerful Tools for Caregivers, Strong Women, Strong Bones, ServeSafe, Small Steps to Health and Wealth and 4-H.

    Linda Wells (New Mexico)

    Serving as an Extension Home Economist, FCS/Elementary teacher and presently as the State Nutrition Program Coordinator, Linda's desire is to improve the quality of life for audiences through Extension programming.

    Glenda Wentworth (Colorado)

    Glenda Wentworth is a respected professional who has the confidence of her peers and of Colorado Extension Administrators. She is a leader, team player, and dedicated to strengthening her community.

    Mary Wilson (Nevada)

    Mary Wilson's programming has addressed many community needs from providing healthcare professionals with researched-based, biased-free nutrition education materials to collaborating with health teachers to increase calcium in teens' diets.

    2008

    Connie S. Moyers (New Mexico)

    Marsha Ann Lockard (Idaho)

    Darlene A. Christensen (Utah)

    Vicki Hayman (Wyoming)

    Jennifer J.Wells (Montana)

    Yvonne Nicholson (California)

    Ruth Carolyn Jackson (Arizona)

    2007

    Linda M. Block (Arizona)

    Linda Block is an FCS Agent and cocoordinator of CHAPS. In the past six years, 633 teams with 5,669 participants in Walk Across Arizona walked 1,164,681 miles and the Pima County Bone Builders' Program trained 130 volunteers and delivered 490 classes and fairs to reach over 58,000 people.

    Sally R. Bowman (Oregon)

    Sally Bowman is a Family Specialist who garnered over $1.4 million in external funds to develop geriatric education materials, gerontology events, and experiential early childhood, hunger, and inmate transition simulations. She provides technical assistance and evaluation for 18 rural parent education projects, and oversees the Food Stamp Nutrition Education Program.

    Margaret C. Johns (California)

    Nutrition education, money management and workforce preparation for low-income families are the focus of Margaret's program. She utilizes a trainer-the-trainer program delivery model to extend researched-based programs throughou Continued Excellence Award — Central Region

    2001

    Peggy Anderson (North Dakota)

    Peggy is highly aware of and sensitive to the needs and issues in her counties and responsive to those needs. Her strengths are providing nutrition education for all ages.

    Deborah Angell (Ohio)

    Deb has contributed to professional development opportunities of others related to her specialization, nutrition and food safety, including journal articles, professional presentations, and a food preservation update for Extension professionals.

    Brenda Bell (Missouri)

    The professional development of teachers, health professionals and early childhood educators statewide has been enhanced through innovative programs and resources developed by Brenda Bell to address specific educational needs.

    Ellen Eddy (South Dakota)

    Programming efforts are concentrated in the areas of food safety, child care, Medicare Part D, and nutrition. She has given leadership to FNP, her field education unit, and local affiliate.

    Amy Griswold (Illinois)

    Amy Griswold provides family life programs, focusing on issues of adult life and aging. She has authored educational materials and continues to provide training to families and aging network professionals.

    Vickie Hadley (Indiana)

    Vickie Hadley's commitment to providing financial management education and food handler certification to empower individuals and families to improve their lives characterizes her career in Purdue Extension.

    Carla Morrical-Frederking (Kansas)

    Carla has worked 27 years with Kansas Extension. Programs have focused on foods, food safety and media including weekly Internet segments with Hays Daily News for the past two years.

    Joanne Pihlaja (Michigan)

    Joanne Pihlaja's career has been a combination of administrative leadership and FCS programming county-wide, regionally, and state-wide. As SNAP-Ed regional coordinator, one of her main responsibilities has been professional development.

    Susan Plassmeier (Indiana)

    Susan is a 26-year veteran of Purdue Extension. She works closely with local schools teaching wellness programs. She is a past state president and served on the national By-Laws committee.

    Patricia Steiner (Iowa)

    In addition to personal professional development, Patricia provided opportunity for leaders in Iowa and other states to participate in professional development experiences in Mexico to better assist new resident families.

    Lori Zierl (Wisconsin)

    Lori Zierl has been a member of NEAFCS for 15 years. She is actively involved in professional improvement programs, the promotion of professional development of others and leadership.

    Susan Zies (Ohio)

    2010 Continued Excellence Award, Susan Zies, Ohio State University Extension, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Lucas County, Maumee Valley EERA.

    2009

    Kim Brantner (Iowa)

    Kim Brantner engages in relevant professional development opportunities to keep abreast of research and educational information in her profession as well as to seek new cutting edge information for clientele.

    Carol Ann Burtness (Minnesota)

    Carol Ann is committed to participating in professional development offerings which strengthen her role as a food safety educator. Her NEAFCS involvement and new friendships also enhanced her educator skills.

    Melinda Hill (Ohio)

    Melinda has been strengthening families in Wayne County for 20 years with programs addressing childhood obesity, child care provider trainings, preserving family memories, after-school cooking/nutrition programs and building positive relationships.

    Genise Huey (Indiana)

    Genise Huey has been a Consumer and Family Sciences Extension Educator in Posey County Indiana for 32 years. She participates in many professional development acti Continued Excellence Award — Southern Region

    2010

    Karen Armbruster (Oklahoma)

    Karen Armbruster has served Woods County as an Extension Educator for the past thirty years. She has targeted school-aged children and the elderly with nutrition education programs.

    Kathleen Aycock (Texas)

    Kathlene Aycock, CEA - FCS has been actively involved with NEAFCS/TEAFCS for 28 years and feels it is important to remain active and keep current in professional organizations.

    Tawnya Crockett (Mississippi)

    Tawnya Crockett provides programs to improve the financial health of families in Mississippi. She works with local and state partners to meet the needs of all age citizens.

    Amy Elizer (Tennessee)

    In 2009, Amy taught the Personal Financial Management course for nearly 1,100 persons filing Chapter 13 bankruptcy. This fee-based program generates $8,000 for use in her FCS programs.

    Sheila Fawbush (Kentucky)

    Sheila Fawbush is committed to professional development because she wants to share the latest research using innovative teaching techniques to help others learn information and skills to improve their lives.

    Betty Gottler (Alabama)

    Betty Gottler develops citizenship, leadership and life-skills in Alabama youth. She has worked more than 35 years across county, regional and state levels within Extension.

    Gail Hanula (Georgia)

    Gail Hanula, Ph.D., R.D., is Extension Nutrition Specialist/EFNEP Coordinator at The University of Georgia. She has served as a Senior District Director of GEAFCS and chair of the awards subcommittee.

    Johanna Hicks (Texas)

    From diabetes education to marriage education, from nutrition classes to sewing classes, Johanna provides a well-rounded foundation of research-based Extension programming to Hopkins County citizens.

    Celia Hill (Florida)

    Throughout Celia's career she has partnered with organizations to teach principles of money management and nutrition. She also teaches ServSafe and Train the Trainer nutrition classes for Senior Center managers.

    Janet Hollingsworth (Georgia)

    Janet's innovative programming and leadership has enabled her to work in partnership at the national, state, and local levels. Her areas of expertise include Nutrition Education and Food Safety.

    Evelynn Arleen James (Oklahoma)

    Making a difference in lives is the goal of Arleen James. Dedication to excellence in programming in Nutrition and Family resiliency makes her a respected professional in her county.

    Robbie Melton (Tennessee)

    As the extension agent in Overton County Robbie has been intensively involved with radon awareness, breast cancer, food safety and teen pregnancy prevention.

    Linda Mock (Texas)

    Committed to improving the lives of families, individuals, and Extension professionals through education and leadership, Linda Mock engages in relevant professional development opportunities to implement innovative and creative programming.

    Susan Pickle (Arkansas)

    Susan has been a member for 28 years. She served as state president and is serving as Vice-President for Public Affairs. She is NEAFCS Public Affairs Education committee chair.

    Jane Proctor (Kentucky)

    Jane Proctor believes that commitment to the pursuit of professional development opportunities requires both personal responsibility and dedication. She continues to strive for innovative thinking while contributing to our profession.

    Becky Reynolds (Arkansas)

    During a 34 year career, Rebecca Reynolds has served as 4-H agent and family & consumer science agent in two counties. She has represented Arkansas as a presenter at several national conferences.

    Nancy Rucker (Tennessee)

    Nancy Rucker is an Extension Agent and County Director in Cheatham County, Tennessee. She is an active TEAFCS member. Her p Continued Excellence Award — Eastern Region

    2010

    Nancy Grotevant (Pennsylvania)

    Nancy Grotevant, an Extension Educator for 20 years, has conducted programs addressing timely lifespan issues. She's utilized professional development to enhance her skills as well as to effectively educate others.

    Miriam Leatherman (West Virginia)

    Miriam Leatherman celebrates 31 years in Extension education. Hardy County families benefit from her leadership and creative programming with the Family Issues Task Force, Child Care Center, wellness, and 4-H.

    2009

    Nadine Reimer (Maine)

    In 31 year Nadine has procured almost 2,000,000 in grants and awards including in 1991 the Water Quality Education Award, 1994 Distinguished Service and 2005 the Community Partnership Award.

    2008

    Elaine Patricia Bowen (West Virginia)

    Kathleen Theresa Morgan (New Jersey)

    2007

    Guendoline Brown (West Virginia)

    Guen Brown, PhD provides leadership for WV Nutrition and Health programs including Dining with Diabetes, the Diabetes Symposium, and Germ City. In 2006, she implemented a new program - A New You: Health for Every Body. The WV Diabetes Education program received the 2005 Northeast Extension Director's Award of Excellence.

    Jane K. Conroy (Maine)

    Jane K. Conroy, Extension Educator with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension. Most recently, her program leadership focuses on financial literacy through the life cycle. She is currently doing research on what influences consumer buying in rural Maine. She authors a bi-monthly newsletter for individuals and families called Money $ense.

    Cassandra Sue Corridon (Maryland)

    Extension has been "career of choice" for Cassandra Corridon since she was 12 years old and after twenty- three years, still is! Youth and family programs are her first love. Nutrition, health and safety, her focus with thousands of working demonstrations - classes, fairs, trainings, creative handwashing methodologies, train the trainers.

    Mary Alice Gettings (Pennsylvania)

    Mary Alice Gettings, a Nutrition and Food Safety Educator, is interested in nutrigenomics and the use of dietary supplements, along with diet, to treat and prevent disease. She has also been integral in leading the food safety Plan of Work in Pennsylvania in the area of statewide evaluation.

    Sandra Parker Hall (Pennsylvania)

    Sandra Parker Hall believes professional development collaborative partnerships are critical to meeting the needs of clientele and providing cutting edge programs. Sandra continually develops innovative educational programs. Her works focuses on Professional development for child care providers and osteoporosis prevention. She continues to work to make life better in Pennsylvania.

    Diane Elaine Mincher (Vermont)

    Diane continues to be proactive in developing very successful nationally recognized nutrition and literacy programs including Food, Culture and Reading; Food, Fun, and Reading; plus Growing Connections, a garden- enhanced nutrition education program. Diane's varied programming efforts have improved the quality of life for Vermonters.

    2006

    Shirley B. Bixby (Pennsylvania)

    "Bloom where you are planted" best illustrates Shirley's accomplishments. Over 22 years, she served two state extension systems, earned a graduate d e g ree and progressed from entry level to management positions, and successfully adapted to changing work environments. Her future rests with mastery and application of web-based technology for extension education.

    Maria C. Young (New Jersey)

    Maria Young believes professional development collaborative partnerships are critical to meeting the needs of our clientele and providing cutting edge programs. Maria continually develops innovative educational programs. Currently her work focuses on fa Continued Excellence Award — Western Region

    2010

    Darlene Christensen (Utah)

    Darlene Christensen is an Extension Agent/Assistant Professor for Utah State University. During her career, she has focused on food safety and hand washing education, youth development and financial management education.

    Janice Gregg (Oregon)

    Being better as a professional has resulted in helping staff to be better at what they do; this includes encouraging emerging leaders to see a future in our professional organization.

    Ruth Jackson (Arizona)

    The desire to promote and see positive progress in my community led me to Cooperative Extension 32 years ago, an opportunity to make change in others and myself, through education.

    Audrey Liddil (Idaho)

    Audrey Liddil has worked 22 years as a Family and Consumer Science Extension Educator for the University of Idaho. She is applying for the NEAFCS Idaho Affiliate Continued Excellence Award.

    Connie Moyers (New Mexico)

    Connie Moyers has served as Roosevelt County, NM Extension Home Economist for 14 years. She is responsible for adult and 4-H programming and serves as county program director.

    2009

    Patti Griffith (Wyoming)

    Patti, a 16 year Nutrition/Food Safety & 4-H educator, she helps people focus on healthier choices, body size acceptance, and living better through increased physical activity, and nutritional knowledge.

    Shelly Porter (New Mexico)

    Shelly Porter, a 19 year Colfax County FCS Educator and Director with NMSU-CES, has positively impacted adult and youth audiences in food and nutrition and health and family wellness.

    2008

    Marsha A. Goetting (Montana)

    Paula Roybal Sanchez (New Mexico)

    Phyllis B. Lewis (Wyoming)

    Kristine Alice Long (Alaska)

    Chris R. Koehler (Washington)

    Margie P. Memmott (Utah)

    2007

    Patricia Jean Aaron (New Mexico)

    Patricia Aaron has worked as Extension Home Economist for 17 years for the NMSU Extension Service in Bernalillo County. Her main programming is in the nutrition and food safety areas. Patricia has served as President, Vice President and Treasurer for NMEAFCS. She is a well respected, professional educator.

    Marilyn King Albertson (Utah)

    A Family & Consumer Science Agent for 22 years, Marilyn's focus is teaching financial management to bankruptcy filers, low income households, Utah Saves enrollees and youth. First Time Homebuyer education is taught through classes and an online First Time Homebuyer Education Course created by her and two extension colleagues.

    Ann Elaine Diede (Washington)

    Ann Diede, Extension Educator for 23 years, has conducted programsaddressing timely parenting and family issues, including special efforts to reach Latino families and women involved in agriculture. She focuses on the development of community collaboratives and the training of others to plan and deliver educational programs.

    2006

    Joanne Kay Austin (Washington)

    Joanne Austin, Extension Educator for 22 years, has developed exemplary life skills and food safety programs. On an ongoing basis she utilizes professional development opportunities not only to enhance her skills, but to motivate and inspire her peers, staff, volunteers, and collaborators to more effectively educate others.

    Brenda Kay Bishop (New Mexico)

    Brenda Bishop has been Quay County's Home Economist for 19 years, during which she has balanced a demanding traditional 4-H, a non-traditional 4-H and an active adult program including administering an After School Program for 11 years. Recently she has focused her efforts in Nutrition and Diabetes.

    Jane K. Frobose (Colorado)

    Jane K. Frobose, Colorado State University - Denver County Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences, Extension Agent Extension Educator of the Year

    2010

    Peggy Powell (Kentucky)

    Excellence in programming, professional development and leadership is best achieved thru collaborative partnerships utilizing creativity, diligent efforts and people centered approaches is the base philosophy of Peggy Powell's Extension career.

    2009

    Judith Matlick (West Virginia)

    WVEAFCS/NEAFCS impacted my Extension career and helped me accomplish the Extension goal to help the citizens of Jefferson County and West Virginia Put Knowledge to Work.

    2008

    Sharon Hoelscher Day (Arizona)

    2007

    Theresa Cook Allan (Tennessee)

    Theresa Allan is widely recognized as an excellent educator bringing expertise, creativity, and collaboration with multiple community partners to provide successful programs that have impacted a diverse clientele in Trousdale County. While maintaining these programs, she has participated in professional development and provided leadership at the state and national level.

    2006

    Lynn Fisher Little (Maryland)

    Lynn Little conducts a comprehensive FCS program in Washington County, Maryland. Her educational efforts focus on Family Financial Management, Nutrition, Health and Well-being, and Child Care. Lynn also serves as County Extension Director. She is dedicated to the Maryland Cooperative Extension motto, educating people to help themselves.

    2005

    Fay B. Strickler (Pennsylvania)

    Creative programming, active committee involvement and collaboration with multiple community partners led to successful foods, nutrition and food safety programs that impacted diverse clientele in Berks County. Strickler maintained high quality educational programs while participating in professional development opportunities, international experiences and serving in state and national leadership roles.

    2004

    Debbie W. Purvis (Georgia)

    Throughout her career with the Georgia Extension Service, Debbie Purvis has developed a variety of innovative programs in the areas of nutrition and food safety, as well as secured grant funding through community collaborations in reaching Georgia's growing Latino population in rural Colquitt County.

    2003

    Donna K. Donald (Iowa)

    Donna combines stellar extension programming with personal and professional growth. She is widely recognized as an excellent educator bringing expertise and creativity in an extensive teaching and outreach program. Exemplary organizational skills allow her to maintain quality educational programming while providing leadership at a state and national level.

    2002

    Nancy B. Potter (New York)

    Nancy demonstrates a passion for organizing people to reach their dreams. Facilitating the learning-reflection-action process, she creates collaborations that have established and sustained multiple community-based programs impacting families, community professionals, and policy makers. Her successful grant writing supports innovative education and research extending from Small Business Energy Efficiency to Parenting Skills Workshop Series, and Parents Apart.

    2001

    Donna Gayle Clore (Kentucky)

    Addressing key issues within the community via innovative programming, successful grant writing and building coalitions has lead to Donna's overall success in reaching and making an impact on the lives of families. Receiving $331,400 in grants has helped expand and teach new audiences. Her leadership and involvement within professional organizations and community sustains her growth as a professional.

    2000

    Madeleine Greene (Maryland)

    1999

    Margaret Viebrock (Washington)

    1998

    Ida Marie Snorteland (South Dakota)

    In the 34 years Ida Marie Snorteland has worked for the Florence Hall Award

    2010

    Diana Doggett (Kentucky)

    2nd Sunday is a 21st Century parade with a purpose. Closing a roadway enables Kentuckians to take the lead in fighting a U.S. trend toward low-level physical activity.

    Patricia Hildebrand, Debra Bartman, Angela Lyons (Illinois)

    Three University of Illinois educators conducted financial training conferences and online courses addressing emerging issues. Approximately 5000 educators used the resource materials to reach over 100,000 students.

    Harriet Shaklee, Diane Demarest, Lorie Dye, Cindy Kinder, Carol Hampton, Valdesue Steele, Kathee Tifft, Janica Hardin, Jennifer Cammann, Patti O'Hara, (Idaho)

    BLOCK Fest™ is a block-building extravaganza that teaches parents and young children early math and science concepts, with lasting impact as parents support continued math and science exploration at home.

    2009

    Daryl Minch (New Jersey)

    Living With Food Allergies addresses the issue of keeping people with food allergies safe. The program focuses on health, food safety and interpersonal communication issues.

    Linda Mock, Alexis Cordova, Lynna Wright, Michelle Allen (Texas)

    Over 550 families enrolled in multi-district Head Start programs were impacted by Families Reading Every Day which focused on helping parents develop and maintain daily reading activities with their children.

    Amanda Root, Carol West, Kyrie Russ (New York)

    This project assists families and schools in New York State in working together and forming cooperative partnerships to ultimately increase student achievement.

    Carol Turner, Martha Archuleta, K'Dawn Jackson, Lourdes Olivas, Carmen Moreno, Ann Bock, Rosa Lopez, Stacey Carver, Kari Bachman, Beverly Glaze (New Mexico)

    Fit Families looks at obesity by addressing the interplay of factors contributing to teens and children becoming overweight: lack of physical activity, unhealthy eating patterns, and family systems.

    2008

    Luann Boyer (Colorado), Lisa Gilmore (Arkansas), Aaron Ebata (Illinois), Barbara O'Neill (New Jersey), Elizabeth Trejo (Texas)

    2007

    Marilyn Bischoff, Beverly Healy, Lyle Hansen, Kathee Tifft, Barbara Petty, Marsha Lockard, Audrey Liddil, Carol Hampton, Janice Stimpson, Sharlene Woffinden, Rhea Lanting, Marnie Spencer, Donna Gillespie, Luke Erickson (Idaho)

    University of Idaho Extension educators facilitated twenty-six Long Term Care for You and Your Loved Ones seminars since 2003. More than 2,000 Idaho residents gained an understanding of long term care options, costs and how to plan for a "later life" of health and dignity.

    Linda Combs (Kentucky)

    "The New Family" To meet the needs of the "new" emerging family Extension along with community partners developed a front line attack plan. Extension offers parenting and life-skills education throughout the county to meet "today's" family overwhelming mental, physical, social and economic issues.

    Sondra Lynn Ganus (Tennessee)

    Camp Energize was a day camp developed to provide a positive, educational environment for underprivileged children, focusing on nutrition, health and fitness; giving youth the opportunity to expand their culinary skills, learn fun and exciting ways to become active, gain positive self esteem and become better leaders of the community.

    Georgia Kight, Shari Farless, Kelly Canupp, Jewel Winslow, Anna Peele, Carmen Long, Shenile Ford, Candace Murray, Elizabeth Furlough, Yvonne Mullen, Melinda Houser, Lori Ivey, Deborah McGiffin (North Carolina)

    Medicare introduced the biggest change in 2006 with the new Medicare D Prescription Drug plans. Thirteen FCS Agents and volunteers in NC enrolled 3,837 Medicare beneficiaries in a Prescription Drug plan saving them approximately $3,837,000. Extension FCS agents conducted 165 educational presentati New Professional Award

    2010

    Melanie Jewkes (Utah)

    Since beginning as a new family and consumer science agent in 2008, Melanie has hit the ground running with her programming in both rural and urban counties in Utah.

    2009

    Treena Musselman (Arkansas)

    High school students known as the STARS teach five nutrition lessons to 450 preschoolers annually. Preschool teachers provide reinforcement lessons. Surveys indicate students taste new foods. Parents also report changes.

    2008

    Joan Mason (Georgia)

    2007

    Amanda McDanel (North Carolina)

    Amanda McDanel's contemporary programming in the areas of nutrition and wellness and child and family development delivers research based information in an experiential context-relevant manner. Highlighted programs include Good Grief: A Support Group for Grieving Children, Culinary Adventures, and Grossology: Enhancing Math and Science Activities in the Classroom.

    2006

    Sondra Lynn Ganus Apple (Tennessee)

    Sondra Ganus Apple works in Marshall County with 75 percent program responsibility in FCS. In one year alone, Sondra has made approximately 4,155 individual contacts teaching nutrition to youth, as well as providing more than 2,055 adults with necessary nutrition literature brought home by their children or distributed at site locations.

    2005

    Laura Royer (Florida)

    Laura Royer joined the Florida Extension Service in September 2002, specializing in housing and financial management. A graduate from the University of Florida, she is working towards a master's degree in Financial Planning. Laura has developed successful programs in home-buying, financial management and consumer fraud for teens and adults.

    2004

    Denise Hanner Continenza (Pennsylvania)

    The applicant for this award has forged many collaborations within her community during the past 2 and 1/2 years. She has also developed and successfully implemented programs that meet the needs of the people in her community by utilizing extension resources as well as by consulting with advisory board members.

    2003

    Jennifer Eich (Colorado)

    Jennifer has served as the Extension Nutrition and Family and Consumer Science Agent in Adams County since October 2001. Her primary responsibilities include nutrition and health education programming. She strongly believes that opportunities in the community empower individuals to make positive lifestyle changes.

    2002

    Marcia E. Weber (Pennsylvania)

    The nominee has served as the Family Living Agent in York County since October 2000, with primary responsibilities in the adult program. Program responsibilities include: food safety, foods and nutrition, life skills, and childcare/parent education programming. The individual provides support to the 4-H Family Living program.

    2001

    Laura M. Stanton (Ohio)

    Laura Stanton has made a positive impact on the lives of families in Butler County since she started working for Ohio State University Extension. People know who she is and respect her for the work she has done to improve the lives of youth and families in our community.

    1998

    Peggy Olive (Wisconsin)

    Peggy has worked extensively in the development of parent education programs in Richland County, Wisconsin. After assessing local needs, this agent strived to increase the availability of parenting resources and groups, involve older community members in supporting families, and promote access to quality child care.

    Para-Professional Award

    2008

    Stacey McQuaig (Georgia)

    2007

    Melodie Lambert (Alabama)

    Melodie Lambert, a nutrition educator working with limited-resource individuals, personifies an exemplary Extension paraprofessional on a daily basis. Ms. Lambert routinely gives of her talents and expertise to both to her clientele and her co-workers. Through her work, limited-resource families greatly benefit from her creative teaching methods, leadership and compassion.

    2006

    Marilou Vaughn (Wyoming)

    A 19 year Cent$ible Nutrition educator, Marilou makes measurable impacts on individuals and young people. 2004 Outstanding Assistant Projects Manager, team winner for USDA LINC Award for Excellence in Practice and 3rd place NEAFCS Educational Curriculum Package in 2005, Marilou strives to make learning about nutrition fun and meaningful.

    2005

    B. Kaye Stiltner (Virginia)

    Kaye Stiltner demonstrates outstanding work in her position as a program assistant for the Smart Choices Nutrition Education Program. She is meeting the needs of her clients in five diverse counties through Super Pantry programs and making a positive impact on their food safety and nutrition habits.

    2004

    Theresa Serio (Maryland)

    Terry Serio has worked as Extension Educator in Maryland for two years. She has reached over 2,500 low income and special students with programs encouraging economical food preparation, proper food storage and safety. She has developed programs with themes, special events, and experiential activities to ensure memorable and dynamic learning.

    2003

    Laurie Bates (Utah)

    In 2002 Laurie provided nutrition education to 922 low-income county residents. Clients showed significant improvement in nutrition practices, thawing and storing food properly, menu planning, shopping from a list, comparison-shopping and having enough food to eat throughout the month. Margie Memmott is Laurie's supervising FCS Extension Educator.

    2002

    Etherlene Scott (North Carolina)

    Etherlene Scott has worked with adult EFNEP in Robeson for three years. She excels at networking with agencies that serve organized groups to maximize her time and extend her reach across the county. Etherlene's clients consistently make positive dietary changes. Etherlene's enthusiasm is an example to her coworkers.

    2001

    Kimberly Wilson-Sweebe (Ohio)

    Kimberly, in her five and a half years of employment with Extension at 80% FTE, has been a constant asset to meeting the needs and interests of Carroll County, Ohio. Kimberly implements an effective teenage pregnancy prevention program and has promoted this program at the local, state and national level.

    1998

    Ruth Rens (South Dakota)

    Ruth Rens specializes in reaching youth from limited resource families. As a program assistant Ruth brings "Summer Fun With Foods" to community neighborhoods via her EFNEP luggage cart. Creative methods abound as she makes nutrition come alive with taste testing unusual foods, variety in food preparation, and nutrition activities. Sponsoring agent is Sandra Aamlid.

    Dean Don Felker Financial Management Award

    2010

    Nancy Porter (South Carolina), Barbara O'Neill (New Jersey), Megan O'Neil-Haight (Maryland), Pat Swanson (Iowa), M. Fahzy Abdul-Rahman (New Mexico), Eric Anderson (Idaho), Janet Bechman (Indiana), Carolyn Bird (North Carolina), Michael Gutter (Florida), Linda Kirk-Fox (Washington), Michael Ravenscraft (Missouri), Jane Schuchardt (District of Columbia), Sharon Seiling (Ohio), Andrew Zumwalt (Missouri)

    The Financial Security for All CoP provides current, research-based financial information 24/7/365 via the Internet to help people make decisions, develop skills, and plan for their present and future needs.

    Debra Bartman, Angela Lyons, Patricia Hildebrand (Illinois)

    Lyons, Hildebrand and Bartman created the UI Center for Economic and Financial Education website, sharing resources, research and evaluation tools. Financial training conferences reached 5000 educators, benefiting approximately 100,000 students.

    2009

    Ann House, Teresa Hunsaker, Carolyn Washburn, Jana Darrington, Dean Miner, Ronda Olsen, Marilyn Albertson, Darlene Christensen, Ann Parkinson, Susan Haws, Margaret Hopkin, Margie Memmott, Kathleen Riggs, Michael Johnson, Christine Jensen, Joanne Roueche, Ellen Serfustini, Adrie Roberts, Ann Henderson, Clint Albrecht, Anita Raddatz, SuzAnne Jorgensen, Lou Mueller, Jenna Innis (Utah)

    While the matched savings is the centerpiece of an Individual Development Account (IDA), the program has another critical component. This component is the eight hours mandatory money management training.

    Megan O'Neil-Haight (Maryland)

    This effort reached thousands of school children and parents NEAFCS National awards and hundreds of teachers with messages of learning to save early and talking in the home and classroom about managing money.

    2008

    Patricia Brennan (New Jersey), Shirley Peterson (California)

    2007

    Gayle Rose Martinez (Wisconsin)

    Two years after the Alliance for Financial Literacy was formed, a survey of Alliance Board members indicated a belief that by working together they were able to make a greater impact. They implemented a variety of programs in the community including Adult Classes, Reality Stores and an America Saves Campaign.

    Christine Olinsky, Jean Clements, Nancy Hudson (Ohio)

    The Master Money Mentor Training- Manual and PowerPoint presentation are designed to train professionals working with individuals requesting help with money management issues. Participating staff / volunteers gain skills to work effectively with others on money management behaviors, spending plans, debt, financial organizational systems, resources, and measuring impact.

    2006

    Laura Royer (Florida)

    "Moola Venture Money Camp" The spending behavior of youth combined with their limited understanding of financial management promotes habits leading to costly mistakes in the future. Moola Venture Money Camp consists of a comprehensive curriculum that focuses on enhancing the budgeting, credit, investing, banking, comparison shopping and job interviewing skills of today's youth.

    Rebecca Jane Travnichek, Karisha Devlin, Mary Sobba, Robert A. Kelly, (Missouri); Ruth Hambleton (Illinois); and Bob Wells and Tim Eggers (Iowa)

    "Annie's Project: Financial Education for Farm Women" Annie's Project is an educational program that provides farm women with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to make informed risk management decisions regarding their farm business operations. This will enable farm women to become better managers, and in turn, increase the viability of their farming operation.

    2005

    Susan K. Morris, Donna V. Brinsfield, Jinhee Kim, Joanne B. Hamilton, Judith A. Stuart, Lynn F. Little, Madeleine Greene (Maryland)

    "Personal Finance Seminar for Professionals" The Personal Finance Seminar for Mary W. Wells Memorial Diversity Award

    2010

    Lauri Sherfey, Alissa Schneider (Washington)

    Pathway's improves the academic advancement of Latino child care providers, increases skills to deliver quality care, and improves early learning environments to help children be better prepared to enter school.

    2009

    Theresa Allan (Tennessee)

    Thaat ke gaat keel is the cooking school, Theresa Allan developed for the Sudanese mothers and children. Over 1500 Sudanese have been granted political asylum in Sumner County, Tennessee.

    2008

    Shirlye Hopkins (Arkansas)

    2007

    Jan Baggarly, Peggy P. Bledsoe, Donna Cadwell, Bert Tilton (Georgia)

    Operation EATERY (Educating And Training Each Restaurant Yearly), a community partnership developed using a grant, teaches food safety techniques to a low income, ethnically diverse population. This training is especially designed for the food handler with 170 participants receiving a certificate of completion for this six hour class.

    2006

    Joanne Marie Roueche (Utah)

    "Kaysville Community Apartments - Making A Difference" Kaysville Community Apartments are low-income, subsidized housing. Half the residents are Hispanic. All families are very low-income. Extension helped develop community gardens & 14 youth & 10 adults received new bikes. Adults used bikes as transportation to get to work. In addition Wonderful Outdoor World Camps were held.

    2005

    Belinda J. Riddle, Dr. Bobbi Clarke, Whitney Danh (Tennessee)

    "Improving Health Access for Latinos in Rural Tennessee" The Tennessee Latino Health Coalition has improved health care access for Latinos in Coffee and Bedford Counties. Over 200 health professionals developed Spanish language and cultural competency through the Spanish Survival Seminars, Cultural Reality Workshop and other simulations. Over 3,500 families have benefited from the Latino Health Yellow Pages directory.

    2004

    Lisa A. Guion (Florida), Carolyn Perkins, MPH (Texas), Dr. H. Wallace Goddard (Arkansas), Gae Broadwater (Kentucky), Samantha Chattaraj, Stephanie Sullivan-Lytle (Florida)

    "Strengthening Programs To Reach Diverse Audiences Project" There is a growing body of research that presents strategies for planning, marketing and implementing programs that will be more effective with ethnically diverse audiences. Drawing upon this literature, the project team developed and implemented a six-unit curriculum, and many other resources, to build cultural competence among Extension educators.

    2003

    Ann Hinsdale-Knisel (Michigan)

    MSU Extension (Lenawee County) has focused financial and human resources on the issue of diversity/racism. A strategic plan was put in place to address this issue and a comprehensive, multi-faceted program has been implemented. The total staff has been involved, themselves, in experiential and reflective in-service workshops and then has taken aggressive steps to make their programming efforts more welcoming and meaningful to the Lenawee County communities of color/difference. Accomplishments include: a county Extension staff and Advisory Council that reflect the county population; research projects that focus specifically on minority audiences and the economic contributions they make to our county and access to land grant university resources by making our county office welcoming to all Lenawee County citizens.

    2002

    Rhonda Christensen, Deb Kruse, Jan Lietz, Francisco Altamirano (Iowa)

    The minority population in Buena Vista County exploded from 160 to 2560 in the last decade. Extension has responded by working with minority leaders and families to establish priorities and has now become the go-to agency for program development, research, and practical solutions to better serve the needs of the new immigrants.

    2001

    Program Excellence Through Research Award

    2010

    Barbara O'Neill, Dr. Robin Brumfield, Stephen Komar, Robert Mickel (New Jersey)

    Many farm operators are approaching retirement age and have unique planning needs. Focus groups were held with New Jersey farm families to inform the development of an online retirement course.

    2009

    Lori Zierl, Kristen Bruder, Annette Bjorklund, Joan Sprain, Dianne Weber (Wisconsin)

    Local research combined with a thorough review of literature helped determine content and format for a new college transition program for high school students and their parents/caregivers.

    2008

    Harriet Shaklee (Idaho), Elizabeth Reames (Louisiana)

    2007

    Barbara O'Neill (New Jersey), Jing Xiao (Arizona), John Grable (Kansas), Ruth Lytton (Virginia)

    Rutgers Cooperative Extension developed four online financial selfassessment quizzes: Financial Fitness Quiz, Identity Theft Risk Assessment Quiz, Investment Risk Tolerance Quiz and Personal Resiliency Assessment Quiz. The quizzes provide scores and feedback to consumersand collect data for research about financial practices.

    Joan Wages, Sarah Burkett, Stephanie Diehl, Elena Serrano, Julie Shelhamer (Virginia)

    Impacts of the childhood overweight prevention program, Healthy Weights for Healthy Kids, were measured by administering pre and post- tests to 319 youth participants. Results showed higher confidence, better attitudes and improved behaviors related to choosing healthy snacks, drinks and portion sizes, after the program.

    2006

    Matthew S. Kaplan, Lynn James and Nancy Ellen Kiernan (Pennsylvania)

    "Intergenerational Approaches to Nutrition Education" This research explored how youth, their parents and grandparents discuss issues related to eating healthfully (and unhealthfully). Families reported excessive communication difficulties and requested help in finding ways to work together to attain a healthier family diet. Results informed the development of two new intergenerational family nutrition education demonstration programs.

    Martha A. Raidl, Audrey Liddil, Julia Welch, Kris Spain, Marnie Spencer, Marsha Lockard, Rhea Lanting and Shelly Johnson (Idaho)

    "The Healthy Diabetes Plate" One hundred seventeen participants completed the four lesson diabetes education curriculum called The Healthy Diabetes Plate. Between 86- 99% of participants were able to correctly plan breakfast, lunch, and dinner meals. Eating habit surveys completed at lessons 1 and 4 showed participants significantly increased their fruit and vegetable consumption.

    2005

    Elaine Courtney, Linda B. Bobroff, Nancy J. Gal (Florida)

    "Take Charge of your Diabetes Research Project" Take Charge of Your Diabetes is a 9 session program tested in 2003 and 2005. Participant's Hemoglobin A1C, blood lipids, weight and blood pressure were measured pre, post and 3 months followup. Changes were significant and likely due to healthy lifestyles taught during the course.

    B. Susie Craig (Washington), Allison Nichols, Guendoline Brown (West Virginia), Lynn Nakamura-Tengan (Hawaii), Sandra McCurdy (Idaho), Donnie L. Cook (Alabama A&M)

    "Germ City: Clean Hands, Healthy People Program" Germ City, a USDA funded Extension, education and research project reached 400,000 children and adults in Washington, Idaho, West Virginia, Hawaii, and Alabama facilitating changes in handwashing at fairs, community events, and schools. Observational studies and intent-to-change research conducted with elementary and middle-school students and during fairs will be highlighted.

    2004

    Mary L. Blackburn, Amy B. Joy, Anna C. Martin, Barbara Turner, Estella A. West, Lucia L. Kaiser, Marilyn S. Townsend (California)

    "Evaluating EFNEP and FSNEP Programs with a Food Behavior Checklist" This research designed and validated a Food Environmental Education Award

    2010

    Sara Jenkins, Peggy Powell, Linda Adler (Kentucky)

    Living Green . . . A Matter of Choice was taught to 2,730 individuals. As a result, 97% learned basic environmental concepts and 1,700 environmentally conscience people reduced consumption of plastic bags.

    2009

    Laurie Cantrell, Pamela Turner, Rachel Hubbard, Sylvia Davis, Polly Morgan, Nancy Bridges, Ann Hudgins, Debbie Purvis, Andrea Scarrow (Georgia)

    The severe drought conditions in Georgia spurred a state-wide focus on water conservation. Every Drop Counts: Conserve Water at Home teaches indoor water conservation techniques everyone can adopt.

    2008

    Debra Bartman (Illinois), Glinder Stephens (Florida)

    2007

    Elisa Shackelton, William Nobles, Wendy Rice, Kurt Jones, Karen Crumbaker, Sheila Barry, Irene Shonle, Karen Massey, Debbie Alpe, Jan Sennhenn, Rhonda Follman, Donna Leiss, Ken Tremblay, Doug Hall, Laura Au-Yeung, Gale Miller, Anne Zander (Colorado)

    Extension Agents serving 19 Colorado counties collaboratively delivered radon education programs and encouraged residential radon testing. An estimated 139,000 residents were impacted by newspaper articles, radio PSA''s, displays at county fairs, and/or 31 public programs. 1500 short-term and 85 long-term radon test kits were provided free to program participants.

    2006

    Bonnie S. Collins, Bruce Mero, Gretchen Mero and Holly Wise (New York)

    "Bringing the Community Out: Teaching Environmental Stewardship in an Outdoor Classroom" Outdoor classrooms, including nature trails and a butterfly house, were built to provide hands-on experience with nature for families and youth. Field trips for local schools taught youth field observation, data collection and environmental stewardship. Lessons included Kids in the Woods, Good Bugs- Bad Bugs and Meet the Monarchs.

    2005

    Nancy E. Grotevant, Debra Brodhecker, Nilda M. Sessler (Pennsylvania)

    "Clean Air for Children " Children don't have options when regulating their exposure to secondhand smoke so adults must be educated on associated health risks. During this month-long campaign, sponsored by the Pike County Pennsylvania Tobacco Free Coalition, adults who smoked were encouraged to Take It Outside and protect children from secondhand smoke.

    Joan Vinette, James D. Isleib, Janice Nicklas, Rachel Lindquist, Ronald Kinnunen, (Michigan)

    "Life of Lake Superior Youth Program" This summer outdoor education program provides interactive learning opportunities focused on natural features, culture, science, and heritage of the local Lake Superior region. Community natural resource professionals partnered with MSU Extension to deliver diverse workshops teaching youth and their parents to appreciate natural resources that abound in Alger County.

    2004

    Judy Bland, Dr. Jorge Atiles, Rachel West, Terri Cameron (Georgia)

    "The A+ Lunchroom — Tools for Georgia Schools" A team of FACS agents created The A+ Lunchroom program to raise the awareness of indoor air quality issues that impact children's health in schools. They educated 981 School Nutrition Program employees who impact 118,741 children daily in 30 counties. The curriculum addressed IAQ pollutants, symptoms and methods of prevention.

    Elisa Ann Shackelton (Colorado)

    "Radon Education in NW Colorado" Partnering with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Moffat County Cooperative Extension has delivered radon education programs aimed at increasing public awareness related to the health hazards of indoor radon. Educational outreach has been accomplished through the use of TV, radio, newspaper, and numerous public presentations.

    2003

    Barbara W. Mobley, Laura Booth (Alabama)

    The goal of Alabama's Environmental TRAIN THE TRAINER progra Early Childhood Child Care Training Award

    2010

    Dawn Contreras, Kendra Moyses, Holly Tiret (Michigan)

    MSU Extension is working to meet the need for comprehensive, statewide training for Michigan's childcare providers. Workshops were held for 15,000 providers resulting in increased behaviors related to high-quality childcare.

    2008

    Karen Benson (Mississippi)

    2007

    Kathleen Hetzel, Joan Laurion, Sue Nagelkerk, Cheryl Rew Stapleton, Mary Roach, Tina Ginner (Wisconsin)

    GOOD early care and education programs help children grow and learn, but GREAT programs strengthen families' commitment to child development. A new five-session "Connecting with Families" curriculum provides Extension educators with the outline, research-based materials, and activities to strengthen early care and education professionals' relationships with families.

    2006

    Patricia L. Faughn, Brenda Eyler, Debbie McClellen, Judy Taylor, Sheri Merry and Tessa Hobbs-Curley (Illinois)

    "Creating Teachable Moments" Creating Teachable Moments is a curriculum for use with early child care professionals and teachers. Participants learn the art of creating a teachable moment from everyday behaviors they want to reinforce or diminish. TeRRiFiCC Teachable Moments, a ready-made resource of 75 activities for pre-K-2nd grade, was developed to assist participants.

    2005

    Sherry Lynn Rocha (Illinois)

    "Nurturing Creativity in Children" Nurturing young children's creative potential is not a frill. It stands at the center of preparing children for life. Creativity is extremely important while educating children who will become scientists, inventors, artists, musicians, innovators, problem solvers, and CEO's of the future. This training models activities for implementation of creativity skills.

    2004

    Jana Osbourn, Amy Chapman, Donna Williams, Kelly Thorp, Rebecca Rogers, Sandra Kunkel, Shea Nebgen (Texas)

    "Hill Country Professional Child Care Providers Conference" The Hill Country Professional Child Care Providers Conference which began nearly 20 years ago has since evolved into a dynamic, highly anticipated educational program that reaches over 200 providers annually. In 2003, the conference had an economic impact of over $2 million through sustained employment of the child care providers.

    2003

    Debora VanDevender, Evelyn Acklin, Kathy Alexander, Sharon Busler, Jo Beth McGilbra, Susan Seal (Mississippi)

    In order to improve the overall learning experience for childcare providers, Home Economists in east Mississippi launched a distance education program. The weekly "Workshop by Mail" series included seven written lessons and a supporting video. Upon completion of lessons, video and written assignments participants received ten in-service hours.

    2002

    Lisa D. Jordan (Georgia)

    Every Child's An Individual: Working with Temperament, is a 2.5-hour child care provider training with hands-on activities and lecture to address Georgia child care competencies. An understanding of temperament can assist caregivers in working more responsively and effectively with individual infants and toddlers in their care.

    Food Safety Award

    2010

    Debra Botzek-Linn, Carol Ann Burtness, Lou Ann Jopp (Minnesota)

    Peddling Your Pickles Safely? food safety workshop is for preservers who home can acid foods for sale at Farmers' Markets as a result of Minnesota's pickle bill legislation.

    2009

    Sandra McCurdy, Carol Hampton, Shelly Johnson, Joey Peutz, Laura Sant, Grace Wittman (Idaho)

    Ready-to-go, interactive exhibits were developed to provide reliable, research-based consumer food safety information at health and county fairs, libraries, community centers, and other venues. Participants indicated intent to follow advice.

    2008

    Amy Peterson (Nebraska)

    2007

    Elizabeth Shephard, George Jackow, Jim Richardson (Florida)

    The "Amazing Adventures of Super Hand" is a collaborative effort between Extension, the health department and the school system in Brevard County, in response to Shigella outbreaks in schools. This program has successfully eliminated outbreaks and reduced other incidences relating to hand hygiene in Brevard County Schools.

    2006

    Nancy R. Wiker, Judy Richardson, Marcia Weber, Sandra Parker Hall and Stacey Hutchison Miscisin (Pennsylvania)

    " Keep It Cool! Refrigerator Thermometer Program" Family Living Educators worked as a team to develop a refrigerator thermometer exhibit, adapt a skit and follow-up assessment that helped consumers increase their awareness to monitor temperatures to insure food is out of the temperature danger zone. A majority of the consumers increased their likelihood to check refrigerator temperatures.

    2005

    Suzanne Marie Driessen, Carol Ann Burtness, Connie Schwartau, Deb Botzek-Linn, Glenyce Peterson Vangness, Jean Pitt, Joellen Feirtag, Kathy Brandt, LouAnn Jopp, Roselyn Biermaier, (Minnesota)

    "Serve It Up Safely Renewal Course: Online & Classroom Options" Serve It Up Safely: Certified Food Manger Renewal Course has trained over 800 Minnesota food service managers. This interactive course emphasizes risky food handling practices and introduces emerging trends in food preparation. The online course and numerous classes held statewide provide certified food managers with a choice of training options.

    2004

    Deilee N. Calvert-Minor (New York)

    "Food Safety Training Prepares Teens for Careers in the Food Industry" The Food Industry is the nation's largest employer. To prepare lowincome teens for successful careers, a 5-week summer program focused on career options in the food industry. Students completed a certification course in food safety to increase employability. Field trips provided a chance to see food safety practices in action.

    2003

    Julie Garden-Robinson (North Dakota)

    Over 3000 limited-income consumers participated in classes based on the "Thermy" and "Fight BAC" national food safety campaigns and received food thermometers. Compared with the national average of 5% regularly using food thermometers, in follow-up classes with 58% of the participants, over 70% reported using the thermometers.

    2002

    Judy A. Harrison, Bobby A. Molleur, Peggy Bledsoe, Nancy Bridges, Susan Culpepper, Gloria Drawdy, Lori Howard, Dana Lynch, JoAnn Milam, Debbie Purvis (Georgia), Melissa P. Mixon, Carolyn Conger, Tawnya Crockett, Kay Emmons, Glenda Gregory, Carolyn Lott, Debora VanDevender, Linda Wilemon (Mississippi), Angela M. Fraser, Carmen Long, Susan Morgan, Christine Smith, Debbie Stroud (North Carolina)

    Smart Kids Fight BAC!TM a curriculum for K-3, features an animated video and multi-disciplinary activities to teach food safety concepts. Testing with 1200 children found significant improvement in knowledge of four food safety concepts in first and second graders and two of four concepts in kindergarteners and third graders.

    Extension Housing Outreach Award

    2010

    Judith Corbus (Florida)

    A six-hour program to educate prospective first-time home buyers on the home buying process, home care and maintenance techniques, and in assessing their financial readiness to purchase a house.

    Teresa Lyle, Bobbie Shaffett, Tawnya Crockett (Mississippi)

    Local Area Extension Agents entered into partnerships with national organizations provide training on lead safety using a unique video-conferencing delivery methos. More than 500 homeowners and contractors have been trained.

    Gina Noe (Kentucky)

    The Madison County Home Energy Expo provided energy conservation education for county residents and the opportunity for local businesses and organizations to showcase their energy saving products and services.

    2009

    Deborah Hurlbert, Jeanette Tucker, Deborah Cross, Sheri Fair, Cynthia Richard, Cynthia Stephens, Margaret Burlew, Valerie Vincent, Deniese Zeringue (Louisiana)

    Charting Your Course to Home Ownership guides participants in selecting, negotiating and obtaining the best home and mortgage on their budget. Basic financial management life skills are taught interactively.

    Susan Morris (Maryland)

    The Aging in Place (AIP) program was a collaborative effort to improve outcomes for older Montgomery County residents by introducing AIP concepts, assessing resources and interest in AIP.

    Laura Royer (Florida)

    With Americans spending up to one-half of their income on housing and increased home foreclosures, first-time home buyer education stressing financial readiness has become more important than ever before.

    2008

    Sharon Jeffery (Michigan), Jeanne Brandt (Oregon), Debbie Purvis (Georgia)

    2007

    Marilyn K. Kooiker (Wisconsin)

    Marilyn Kooiker, Burnett County, Wisconsin, Family Living Agent has collaborated with her local Habitat for Humanity organization. She provides home-ownership and money management education to families selected for the Habitat program. In rural northwest Wisconsin, Kooiker has helped these low-income families become successful and responsible homeowners.

    2006

    Becky M. Chenhall, Dr. Jorge H. Atiles, Ginger Bennett, Joyce Habegger and Penny Thompson Keller (Georgia)

    "Georgia Radon Education Program, The University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences" The University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences Cooperative Extension Radon Education P rogram's purpose is to prevent radoninduced lung cancer by promoting radon awareness through Extension. Radon, a naturally occurring invisible radioactive gas, is the second-leading cause of lung cancer. It kills approximately 21,000 people each year.

    2005

    Marcy Krumbine (Florida)

    "There's No Place Like Home" The Home Loan Program provides a unique opportunity for low and moderate- income families to assess their readiness for homeownership and take the steps needed to achieve their dreams. Educational programs include workshops, individual counseling and exhibits. Partnering with local banks, Extension assisted 118 families in becoming homeowners since 2003.

    Pamela D. Lincoln, Gussie McConnell, Linda Baxter (Texas)

    "Your Home is Your Castle" Well-built, affordable housing is indispensable for keeping rural communities vibrant. Extension and USDA Rural Development reached 1245 residents through workshops to inform families of assistance available to repair, purchase or buld a home and steps needed to qualify. As a result, $666,456 was loaned or granted to participants.

    Rebecca L. Versch, Shirley M. Niemeyer (Nebraska)

    "Healthy Homes for Healthy Nebraskans: A Radon Awareness and Testing Campaign" Healthy Homes for Healthy Nebraskans is helping local citizens take steps to lower radon levels in their homes! Since 1999, over 1600 f Community Partnership Award

    2010

    Diana Doggett (Kentucky)

    2nd Sunday is a 21st Century parade with a purpose. Closing a roadway enables Kentuckians to take the lead in fighting a U.S. trend toward low-level physical activity.

    Eileen Krumbach, Lisa Poppe, Andrea Nisley, Dr. John DeFrain, Lee Sherry, Ruth Vonderhoe, Carla Mahar, Dianne Swanson, Mary Ann Holland, Sandra D. Preston, Maureen Burson, LaDonna Werth, Leslie Crandall, Marilyn Fox (Nebraska)

    The court-mandated Guardianship training was developed by UNL Extension for court appointed guardians. It includes guardianship terms, responsibilities to the court and Ward, decision making and understanding financial responsibilities.

    2009

    Karen Ensle (New Jersey)

    Bringing together a local YMCA, Activate America project with Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Union County, Get Moving, Get Healthy, NJ campaign to encourage healthy eating, physical activity and healthy lifestyles.

    Betty Nielson (Tennessee)

    Through collaborative efforts in a rural Tennessee county, a community partnership was formed to promote a healthy weight program focusing on achieving and maintaining a healthier weight and lifestyle.

    2008

    Rebecca Hagen Jokela (Minnesota), Renette Wardlow (Missouri)

    2007

    Judy Berryhill, Mary DeFoor (Tennessee)

    A Tennessee Judge contacted the Extension Service asking help for juveniles going through the court system. The Fitting It Together curriculum (covering communication, anger management, relationships) was developed. Juvenile offenders were court-ordered to attend the classes. Eighty juveniles attended the classes, NONE returned to the court system!

    Mary Richmond (Kansas)

    Mary Frances Richmond, Osage County, Kansas was instrumental in organizing a county-wide coalition targeting substance abuse prevention. She currently serves as chairman of the Board of Directors. The coalition has received $500,000 in grant funds over seven years to conduct programs which have positively affected substance abuse trends.

    2006

    Marilyn Cross Bischoff, Carol Hampton, Beverly Healy, Audrey Liddil, Marsha Lockard, Barbara Petty, Kathee Tifft and Sharlene Woffinden (Idaho); Vicki Hayman, Patti Griffith, Phyllis Lewis, Stella McKinstry, Chris Pasley, Denise Smith, Dr. Ruth Wilson and Carla Mahar (Wyoming); Gail Brand, Susan Brown, Maureen Burson, Ann Fenton, Nancy Frecks, Jeanette Friesen, Teri Gemar, Jessye Goertz, Alice Henneman, Mary Ann Holland, Eileen Krumbach, Kathleen Lodl, Mary Loftis, Leanne Manning, Jeanne Murray, Mary Nelson, Andrea Nisley, Lynne Osborn, Sue Pearman, Deanna Peterson, Carol Plate, Sandy Preston, Sarah Purcell, Debra Schroeder, Cindy Strasheim, Dianne Swanson, Cheryl Tickner, Rebecca Versch, Ruth Vonderohe and Mary Kay Warner (Nebraska); Sandra Aamlid, Donna Bittiker, Amanda Diede, Ellyn Eddy, Sharon Guthmiller, Sally Park Hageman, Carolyn Hendricks, Corrine Huber, Cheryl Jacobs, Bobbi Larsen, Tracey Lehrke, Becky Leonard, Ingrid Lindberg, Julie McKay, Lavonne Meyer, Sandra Namken, Nancy Pauly, Karen Petrik, Debra Rombough, Ruth Schmeichel, Karen Slunecka, Linda I. Smith, Deb Sundem, Laurie Tangen, Karla Trautman, Ann Votaw, Marjorie Zastrow, Elizabeth Gorham (South Dakota); and Caroline E. Crocoll and Anna Mae Kobbe (USDA)

    "Medicare Drug Card Community Partnership" Extension educators in five states partnered with more than 283 civic groups and community agencies to educate and enroll Medicare beneficiaries in the first-ever Medicare Prescription Drug Cards. Nearly 47,000 people were enrolled in Medicare Drug Card programs. Enrollees could afford to purchase medications and saved nearly $1,600,000.

    2005

    Nadine B. Reimer (Maine)

    "Parent Education and Family Services" Parent Education and Family Services, committed to building a nurturing community fo Marketing Package Award

    2010

    Stephanie Derifield (Kentucky)

    Focus groups were organized to discuss opinions and viewpoints of current and former smokers. Various marketing and outreach educational tools were created to address the health issues related to smoking.

    2009

    Julie Garden-Robinson (North Dakota)

    Eat Smart. Play Hard. Together is a multi-faceted marketing and educational program in cooperation with college athlete role models. It includes billboards, radio spots, a Web site/Facebook presence and magazine.

    2008

    Alma Harris (Mississippi), Patricia Hildebrand (Illinois)

    2007

    Lynn James, Margaret Malehorn, Laurie Welch, Matthew Kaplan, Dori Campbell, John Byrnes, Lois Killcoyne, Cynthia Javor, Michael Phillips, Judy Richardson, Mary Fusco (Pennsylvania)

    The Family Fitness program reached 211 students, 122 parents and 3142 educational contacts. Students grades 3-5 and their parents set and made healthy goals and significantly increased fruits, whole grains, willingness to try fruits and vegetables, physical activity, decreased high sugar and fat foods and improved family meals and communication.

    Danielle Summers, Katherine Allen, Elaine Courtney, Mary E. Crisp, Monica Dawkins, Celia B. Hill, Chris Kilbride, Maisielin Ross, Mary Beth Salisbury, Elizabeth C. Shephard, Sharon Treen, Gayle O. Whitworth, Brenda Williams (Florida)

    In an effort to increase awareness of agriculture's economic impact, the Florida affiliate produced a cookbook featuring Florida's agricultural commodities, Simply Florida: A Taste of Flavors from the Sunshine State. A variety of marketing techniques including news releases, flyers, exhibits, radio and television were used to reach over 1,000,000 consumers.

    2006

    Anita McKinney (Florida)

    "First Coast Get Checking Marketing Package" The First Coast Get Checking program was launched in 2005. The marketing program includes two brochures, program flyers, a table tent, web page, gift certificate, news releases, radio and TV spot outlines, marketing ideas for participating financial institutions, and an evaluation summary/flyer which describes the first year results.

    Kathryn L. Sweedler, Jennifer Hunt, Karen M. Chan, Mary Ann Fugate, Pat Hildebrand and Paul E. McNamara (Illinois)

    "Marketing the Plan Well, Retire Well: Your How-To Guide Website" Marketing the Plan Well, Retire Well: Your How-To Guide website ( www. RetireWell.uiuc.edu) included development of brochures, bookmarks, posters, displays, media releases, state-wide campaigns for extension staff, and presentations at national conferences to increase awareness. Through marketing efforts, the website has over one-third million hits and over 3,100 registered users.

    2005

    Darcy L. Dixon, Becki Hester, Carol Willis, Evelyn Whitmer, Jolie Ogg Graybill, Lynne Durrant, Marta Elva Stuart, Patty Merk (Arizona)

    "Marketing the Mind Matters Training Program" Marketing for the Mind Matters Training for Child Care Professionals included development of a logo, brochures, notebooks, totebags, brain stressball, cup and pens. More than 4,000 brochures were mailed to child care facilities throughout the state. The Mind Matters logo is now synonymous with early brain development training in Arizona.

    Marsha Ann Lockard, Audrey Liddil, Barbara Petty, Becky Dahl, Beverly Healy, Carol Hampton, Julia Welch, Kathee Tifft, Marilyn Bischoff, Sharlene Woffinden (Idaho)

    "Increasing the Financial Security of Idaho's Medicare Recipients" Ten University of Idaho Extension Educators developed a state-wide marketing campaign to increase awareness and publicize enrollment activities for the Medicare-approved Drug Discount cards available for Medicare and Medicaid recipients. The campaign used a variety of marketing techniques; including radio and televisions PSA's, new Communications Awards — Newsletters

    2010

    Dawn Contreras, Kendra Moyses, Holly Tiret - 1st Place (Michigan)

    The quarterly Michigan Better Kid Care Newsletter is distributed electronically. It is an educational outreach tool that provides pertinent, research-based information on a variety of subjects within early childhood.

    Debra Botzek-Linn, Carol Ann Burtness - 2nd Place (Minnesota)

    Home Food Preservation Newsletter - With the growing interest in home food preservation, extension responded with an online e-newsletter to meet consumer need for research-based methods, information and resources.

    Linnette Goard - 3rd Place (Ohio)

    Wellness Pages are written and formatted to fit on school lunch menus. Each page includes articles on nutrition facts, a snack recipe, and physical activity targeting children and their parents.

    2009

    Marilyn Albertson, Sara Oldroyd, Sarah Petersen, Elizabeth Garn, Maruja Luis, Stephanie Young, Mary Gedge - 1st Place (Utah)

    On the Home Front FCS Extension Newsletter provides six issues yearly to Salt Lake County residents filled with research-based information in a simple, visually pleasing format in English and Spanish.

    Julie England - 2nd Place (Florida)

    Lake Reflections newsletter provides general interest audiences with timely, researchbased information in financial management, health, nutrition and family matters. The newsletter promotes FCS in particular and Extension as a whole.

    Lee Ann Clark - 3rd Place (Alabama)

    The Extension Newsletter is distributed bi-monthly. Used as an educational outreach tool, it provides pertinent, researchbased information on a variety of subjects and is available electronically and in hard-copy form.

    2008

    1st - Johanna Hicks (Texas)

    2nd - Beth Switzer (Indiana)

    3rd - Maureen Burson (Nebraska)

    2007

    Catherine Lamp, Estella West, Jim Coats, Robin Walton - 1st Place (California)

    First introduced in the 1980's Parent Express, a set of 15 age-paced parenting newsletters covering the first year of life, has been skillfully updated in content and look. Topics include child development, nutrition, health and safety, general infant care, and activities parents can use to stimulate their baby's development.

    Margaret Malehorn, Jane A. Landis, Cheryl A. Miller, Mary Ann Oyler, Sandra Parker-Hall, Nina L. Redding, Nancy E. Routch, Marcia E. Weber, Nancy R. Wiker, Marilyn Z. Jones, Terry A. Lopp - 2nd Place (Pennsylvania)

    Living Well is a newsletter developed by the Capital Region Family and Consuer Sciences Team of Penn State Cooperative Extension and ditributed to 6,000 families in the nine county region. Living Well provides timely, unbiased information on foods & nutrition, food safety, home environment, resource management and family life.

    Christine Flood, Patricia Hammerschmidt, Anne Murphy, Kelly White - 3rd Place (Michigan)

    TEAMTALK, the Michigan Team Nutrition (MTN) newsletter provides ideas and strategies to staff at enrolled MTN schools (K-12) and MSUE county offices to assist schools in partnering with community members and organizations to improve their school nutrition environment. TEAMTALK highlights nutrition education resources, schools' successes, and updates on nutrition-related events.

    2006

    Jean Ann Anliker, Ana Rona, Cindy Hubbard and Lynne Thompson - 1st Place (Massachusetts)

    "Pumpkin Post & Banana Beat Newsletters" The Pumpkin Post (Spanish version: El Recaito) is a fun, educational newsletter series developed by the UMass Extension Family Nutrition Program for low-income parents and caregivers of preschool children. Each issue contains a special insert called the Banana Beat (Spanish version: Sabrosito!) designed for the children themselves.

    Shirley B. Bixby, Darle Communications Awards — Radio

    2010

    Phyllis Lewis - 1st Place (Wyoming)

    On a bi-weekly basis, Lewis records PSAs, which are aired to an estimated 4,000 listeners per airing, which equates to 416,000 annually and 4,160,000 since inception.

    Leigh Anne Aaron - 2nd Place (Georgia)

    Natural Gas Education PSAs were aired throughout the year in Northeast Georgia reaching 312,000 listeners. Topics included saving money and energy, paying bills on time, and preventing CO poisoning.

    Edda Cotto-Rivera, Merari Guillen - 3rd Place (Georgia)

    The DeKalb County Cooperative Extension recognizes the importance of reaching out to diverse audiences. This radio program is an excellent venue to establish an educational relationship with the Hispanic community.

    2009

    Sarah Jones - 1st Place (Texas)

    This early morning, bi-weekly broadcast aired locally and in sister stations in 4 counties, reaching 250000 people. This broadcast featured information on maintaining a healthy weight through permanent lifestyle changes.

    Beth Gaydos, Dave Wilson - 2nd Place (Ohio)

    Announcements and researchbased information are presented during a mid-day interview broadcast reaching 100,000 listeners in southeastern Ohio. This interview featured tips for trimming expenses for food and energy costs.

    2008

    1st - Beth Gaydos (Ohio)

    2nd - Phyllis Lewis (Wyoming)

    3rd - Jane Wolery (Montana)

    2007

    Christopher Sneed - 1st Place (Tennessee)

    A series of three, thirty-second radio announcements was developed by Extension. Announcements were designed to heighten the awareness of families concerning their need to increase savings while reducing debt. Radio announcements reached over 10,000 households in five southeast Tennessee counties. Accompanying financial management programming was attended by 41 participants.

    Beth Gaydos, Mike Partin - 2nd Place (Ohio)

    This late morning interview broadcast is aired weekly on six sister stations and reaches 100,000 listeners in a multi-county area of southeastern Ohio. Topics apply to a general audience and include practical tips or program announcements. This interview featured facts about trans fat, foods sources, and ways to avoid it.

    LaDell Emmons - 3rd Place (Oklahoma)

    No one is prepared for Mother Nature in the form of an ice storm that placed over 50,000 in Southeast Oklahoma without power for 1-2 weeks. Live radio at the Emergency Management Post provided the extension service a rare opportunity to assist listeners in food safety, survival, & preparation.

    2006

    Robin Lynn Eubank - 1st Place (Kansas)

    "Community Meltdown Radio Promotion" The local AM radio station welcomes Seward County K-State Extension to be regular guests on the morning talk show Live From Broadcast Square. This included promotion of Community Meltdown. Also, they produced and aired a Public Service Announcement written to promote Community Meltdown.

    Janice Elizabeth Stoudnour - 2nd Place (Pennsylvania)

    "Families Communicating Love" Families that care about one another communicate their love every day. Parents act as role models for their children as they demonstrate the appropriate use of communication skills. Communicating positive relationship building behaviors on a daily basis improves the quality and commitment within the family relationship for children and parents.

    Cheryl Ann Maxwell - 3rd Place (Arkansas)

    "Nutrition Tip of the Day" March is designated as National Nutrition Month by the American Dietetic Association. To increase awareness of healthy eating practices, 30 second nutrition tips were developed and recorded by Cheryl Maxwell, CEA - FCS for each weekday during March. The 24 PSAs were aired by KBOK Radio in Malvern, Arkansas.

    2005

    Pamela Carol York Communications Awards — Television

    2010

    Kimberly Sopczyk - 1st Place (New York)

    From Farm to Table is a weekly television series reaching over 10,000 households. Viewers learn about local NY farms with interesting field visits and easy, healthy recipes using the produce.

    Edda Cotto-Rivera, Paola Salazar - 2nd Place (Georgia)

    Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer. The TV program Nuestra Georgia from the local Univision Network was an excellent outlet to promote awareness among the Hispanic Community.

    Anne Lindsay - 3rd Place (Nevada)

    The All 4 Kids: Healthy, Happy, Active, Fit videos are part of a complete curriculum utilizing an interdisciplinary approach to address childhood obesity with preschool children, their teachers and families.

    2009

    Daniel Remley, Patrice Powers-Barker, Ana Claudia Zubieta, Hugo Melgar- Quinonez, Maria Carmen Lambea, Chris Taylor, Candace Veney - 1st Place (Ohio)

    Using Social Marketing strategies, the nutrition education videos were specifically designed for Rainbow of Colors choice food pantry clients. The videos are played in waiting areas of the pantries.

    Kimberly Sopczyk - 2nd Place (New York)

    From Farm to Table is a television series inviting viewers to discover the bounty of New York State's Capital Region and to learn to prepare healthy meals using local products.

    Karen Schneider, Keith Silva, Will Mikell, Rebecca Gollin - 3rd Place (Vermont)

    Members of the Vermont Association of Family and Consumer Sciences explore issues of poverty and hunger through community service and experiential learning at the Vermont Food Bank.

    2008

    1st - Dianne Weber (Wisconsin)

    2nd - Nina Roll (Oregon)

    3rd - Margaret Jenkins (Ohio)

    2007

    June Puett, Donna Calhoun, Chuck Denney, Doug Edlund - 1st Place (Tennessee)

    This video highlights the local Tennessee Saves campaign efforts to creatively market financial literacy programs at a sports venue and has inspired campaigns across the country to replicate the program. It has been viewed by over 500,000 including viewers in all Tennessee television markets and several national conferences.

    Judy Branch, Gregg Mousley, Will Mikell, Keith Silva - 2nd Place (Vermont)

    Youth Financial Literacy video promotes the High School Financial Planning Program the National Endowment for Financial Education provides without charge to teachers, home-school parents and human service staff for financial literacy education. Cooperative efforts of the Jumpstart Coalition in education and public policy to achieve greater financial literacy are highlighted.

    Denise Contenenza - 3rd Place (Pennsylvania)

    Seizing the opportunity is what this award winner did in developing her program and adapting it for television. "Overscheduled Families" was produced as a medical report to be delivered during the evening news, a time when busy families are more likely to be available for learning.

    2006

    Joan E. LeFebvre - 1st Place (Wisconsin)

    "Making Your Holidays Affordable" "Making Your Holidays Affordable" was the November 28, 2005, topic for the WJFW-TV12 Money Watch news interview. The University of Wisconsin-Extension, Cooperative Extension Family Living Agent, Joan LeFebvre, presented the idea of a holiday budget with options for creating an affordable holiday.

    Barbara Dawn Petty - 2nd Place (Idaho)

    "Married and Loving It!" The Married and Loving It! promotional video provides an overview of the program. Testimonials from class participants validate the impact participating in the program has made on their marriages. Results of a telephone survey conducted by the University of Idaho indicate the effectiveness by reporting the increase in marital satisfaction.

    Madeleine Greene, Stephe Communications Awards — Written News

    2010

    Mary Loftis - 1st Place (Nebraska)

    Choosing a Medicare prescription drug plan is like the old TV show The Dating Game. But it's not romance you're looking for, just financial savings at the drug store.

    Synithia Williams - 2nd Place (Alabama)

    News article, incorporating a holiday inspired theme, aimed at promoting awareness of sustainability's dual benefits on finance and energy expending for the reader's family as well as the global family.

    Donna Green - 3rd Place (Ohio)

    Financial topics are shared monthly in a column format to approximately 75,000 readers along the north coast. This particular column addressed the emotional and mental difficulties of changing spending habits.

    2009

    Debra DeRossitte - 1st Place (Arkansas)

    From Farm to Table is a television series inviting viewers to discover the bounty of New York State's Capital Region and to learn to prepare healthy meals using local products.

    Mary Holland - 2nd Place (Nebraska)

    Medigap or Medicare Supplement Insurance explained. Medicare Parts A and B cover 80% of health care costs; without supplemental insurance, Medicare beneficiaries owe the balance. Medigap fills in the gaps.

    Carrie Brazeal - 3rd Place (Texas)

    This weekly column, which reaches 25,000 readers, appeared just before school was out for the summer and addressed the importance of reducing screen time and increasing physical activity for children.

    2008

    1st - Julie Garden-Robinson (North Dakota)

    2nd - Lori Ann Hendrickson (Minnesota)

    3rd - Mary Ellen Loftis (Nebraska)

    2007

    Charlotte L. Richert, Donna Pelkey, Raye Ann Jones - 1st Place (Oklahoma)

    Gather Together emphasized success stories resulting from families spending time together at the dinner table. The FOCUS section of the Tulsa Community World featured the Community Nutrition Education Program and the Home and Community Education groups. The article highlighted tips for togetherness to help prevent the incidence of substance abuse.

    Margaret McAlpine - 2nd Place (Florida)

    A community based education and outreach initiative about Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage (Medicare Part D). Utilizing laptop computers with wireless internet technology, the Nassau County FCS Agent helped seniors and the disabled with making informed choices about selecting a Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage plan that was right for them.

    Nancy Stehulak - 3rd Place (Ohio)

    Living Well is a weekly News Column published in the Northwest Signal, Napoleon, Ohios only daily paper. This column by Stehulak covers issues of Parenting, Family Financial Management and Family Food Issues. This column gave information about Setting Teen Limits as a supportive article to a parenting program in progress.

    2006

    Mary L. Rhyne - 1st Place (Oklahoma)

    "Beef Cooking School for Youth" A Beef Cooking School involving 52 4-Her's from three counties provided a day of education, nutrition, skill-building, and fun. Participants prepared and tasted seven beef recipes, and participated in educational presentations and games learning about the beef industry, food safety and preparation, food budgeting, and nutrition.

    Donna R. Martinson - 2nd Place (Kansas)

    "Grandma's Life Provides Lessons for Today" compares the diet and lifestyle of the author's grandmother to current health recommendations, including the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Website addresses for additional information were included. Readers were reminded it is never too late to begin a healthier lifestyle.

    Patricia Jean Aaron - 3rd Place (New Mexico)

    "Add Some Color to Your Diet" Selecting child care is one of the "New Mexico's Own," a bimonthly column written by Patricia since 1994 and published Communications Awards — Overhead Transparencies

    2004

    Susan Kathleen Morris, Joanne B. Hamilton, Judith A. Stuart, Lynn F. Little—1st Place (Maryland)

    "Identity Theft" Four Maryland Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Educators created a 27-slide Identity Theft Program and handout. Forty-four Identity Theft classes, reaching 2,132 Maryland residents, have been taught. In addition, an Identity Theft radio spot was taped for USDA Radio, reaching 675 radio stations and the Voice of America.

    Patricia Faughn—2nd Place (Illinois)

    "You and Your New Baby" You and Your New Baby is a curriculum with overheads developed for use with new parents or those who work with them, but could also be beneficial for caregivers of infants. It outlines eight ways to support an infant's needs and development, and build a strong parent-infant relationship.

    Jan Bennett—3rd Place (Florida)

    "PowerPay Debt Reduction Computer Program" In 2003, 17 PowerPay analyses were completed for Collier County families. This educational program of Utah State University Extension, along with CD installation discs, was shared with 42 Extension professionals from throughout the State via an Abstract Presentation using overhead transparencies at the annual Florida Association of Extension Professionals Conference.

    2003

    1st Place — Marsha A. Hawkins (Idaho)

    "Succeeding in the Working World" is a curriculum that addresses the need to prepare individuals to enter the workforce. The curriculum stresses the importance of developing a strong work ethic. The program covers what employers seek, the importance of making a good first impression, job applications and interview skills.

    2nd Place — Susan Moffatt (Oklahoma)

    No one likes changes. However, change is a fact of life. The transparency program "Life Changes" was developed for use with a variety of groups. It is intended to help individuals cope with change. The program has been used with groups such as National Association of Retired Federal Employees, TANF recipients in out-patient substance abuse training and Oklahoma Home and Community Education.

    3rd Place — Maryellen Garrison (Kentucky)

    These overhead transparencies were developed for Extension Homemaker Leader Trainings. The program is designed to help put current research relative to the importance of sleep to use. The transparencies are a part of a package which contains a script, handouts, Leader Outline, Teaching Plan, PowerPoint presentation and evaluation tool.

    2002

    1st Place — Christy M. Walter (Florida)

    Picnic Safety was developed to use with local citizen groups and the employee wellness program in the county. The program emphasizes the importance of food safety when cooking outdoors such as, boating, grilling, going to the beach, or attending an old-fashioned picnic.

    2nd Place — Diane Whitten, MS (New York)

    My assumption in designing this transparency series for presentation is that most people who take herbal supplements think they are safe because they are natural, and they are bottled and sold like vitamins. However, physical injury and many deaths have been caused by improper use of herbal supplements. My intent is to inform the public about the potential hazards of using herbal supplements, and the limitations of regulations regarding their safety and use.

    3rd Place — Kathryn K. Dodrill (Ohio)

    Cooking for One or Two targeted individuals no longer preparing large meals. Since research reveals food habits affect not only physical health, but also mental ability/attitudes, outlook on life, and ability to cope with stress, this program addressed coping strategies, including planning, shopping, reducing recipes, using leftovers, and small appliances.

    2001

    1st Place — Janet Johnson, Melinda A. McCulley, Jennifer Benham, Luther Communications Awards — Educational Technology

    2010

    Laura Smith - 1st Place (Georgia)

    Online activities attract a younger age group today. Parents must stay informed of Internet dangers and learn the Internet language in order to keep their children safe from online predators.

    Johanna Hicks, Lexie McGrane - 2nd Place (Texas)

    Evaluation is often a dreaded word, but not with Diabetes Jeopardy. This fun, creative tool helps reinforce information learned in diabetes classes while serving as an evaluation instrument!

    Martha Maddox, Brooke Burn - 3rd Place (Florida)

    Addressing the 33% of Sumter County individuals diagnosed with high blood pressure, FCS & Horticulture Agents provided educational information on growing & using herbs to replace sodium in the diet.

    2009

    Alice Henneman - 1st Place (Nebraska)

    Helping people save money was the goal of Supermarket Savings, a Web-based, downloadable PowerPoint. A survey of consumers viewing the materials online indicated 94% found the tips were helpful.

    Julie England - 2nd Place (Florida)

    Osteoporosis affects all ages and ethnicities. Steps to Build Your Bones seeks to increase individuals' awareness of personal risk factors and motivate them to take steps to prevent the disease.

    Karen Poff - 3rd Place (Virginia)

    The innovative Your Family Disaster Plan BINGO game has engaged almost 500 participants in hands-on learning encouraging families to develop action plans enabling them to effectively cope with a disaster.

    2008

    1st - Robert Thee (Pennsylvania)

    2nd - Laura Smith (Georgia)

    3rd - Cindy Shoemaker (Pennsylvania)

    2007

    Marnie Spencer, Laura L. Sant, Rhea Lanting - 1st Place (Idaho)

    Meal Time in Less Time is a threelesson program to teach individuals how to plan quick and healthy meals, shop to save time and money, and prepare healthy meals in less time. Evaluation results indicate that program participants increased healthy meal planning and preparation behaviors.

    Patricia Faughn, Janice McCoy, Angela Wiley, Debbie McClellan, Diane Ryals, Sherry Rocha, Aaron Ebata, Gerri Peeples - 2nd Place (Illinois)

    Your Young Child: Managing Challenging Early Stages is a 7-unit curriculum for use with parents and child care professionals. It addresses adult stress in managing normal yet challenging early child behaviors-- crying, night waking, exploring, separation, choosy eating, toileting, and negativity. These seven behaviors have been associated with child abuse.

    Jane Wolery, Millie Veltkamp, Marla Goodman, Jay Van Voast, Dan Clark, Wade Crouch, Wendy Wedum, Robb Wearley, Adele Stenson, Rhea Brutosky, Jamie Smith - 3rd Place (Montana)

    Jane Wolery, MSU Teton County Extension Agent, and colleagues coordinated a technology retreat for Extension agents, specialists and staff. The retreat included training on a variety of software and updates on the latest tech trends. Participants reported an increase in job efficiency as a result of the training.

    2006

    Colleen Hondl Gengler, Jodi Dworkin and Kathleen A. Olson - 1st Place (Minnesota)

    "Take and Teach Lessons for a Parent or Parents & Teens Together Group" Take and Teach Lessons on bullying, peer pressure and teen decision making were developed for parent only or parent-teen groups. All materials needed are on a single topic CD: facilitator guide, research background, handouts, activities, resource list, PowerPoint, plus how to plan for a successful program.

    Alice Catherine Henneman and Beverly A. Benes - 2nd Place (Nebraska)

    "Spending Your Calorie Salary: Tips for Using MyPyramid" This PowerPoint was developed to teach how to use the new MyPyramid food guidance system. It was made available to other educators via the Internet and was downloaded by 4,087 educators during Communications Awards — Educational Curriculum Package

    2010

    Susan Baker (Colorado), Barbara Sutherland (California), Kathryn Rogers (Colorado), Rita Mitchell (California), Ann Diker (Colorado) - 1st Place

    Eating Smart • Being Active is an all-encompassing, dialogue-based, nutrition education curriculum for adults, designed for use by paraprofessionals when teaching low-income families to learn healthy lifestyle choices.

    Amanda Root - 2nd Place (New York)

    Magic Years puts early childhood development and parenting best practices in ready-to-go format with PowerPoint and factsheets for six sessions. Evaluations document the effectiveness of the program.

    Katherine French, Marilyn Corbin, Brenda Daelhousen, Mary Alice Gettings, Julie Haines, Clancy Cash Harrison, Lynn James, Nancy Ellen Kiernan, Richard Kralj, Lois Killcoyne Kunkle, Teresa Naylor, Christine Orrson, Robin Rex, Dottie Stambaugh, Lynda Lueck Stoner, Marcia Weber, Nancy Wiker - 3rd Place (Pennsylvania)

    My New Weigh of Life is a weight-management program designed to help participants make the necessary personal choices to reach a healthier body weight, maintain their weight and promote health.

    2009

    Gail Hanula, Rhea Bentley, Phyllis Cain, Angela Hairston, Esmeralda Hernandez, Ramona Adams, Judy Hibbs, Pearl Solomon, Marilyn Huff-Waller, Martha Turner, Michele Robinson, Darenda Clowers, Tonya Denerson, Kisha Faulk, Gwen Jackson, Sonia Leverett, Alesia Mays, Charlene May, Beffie Morse, Diane Rhodes- Payne, Betty Sabbath, Jessica Hill , Brenda Maddox, Vivian Favors, Molly Kimler, Alma Rhoden, Sandra Stringer, Sarah Delzeith - 1st Place (Georgia)

    Food Talk, a theory-based curriculum, is designed to help limited resource clients overcome barriers to eating more fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy foods. It features learner-centered education and experiential learning.

    Lori Zierl, Kristen Bruder, Annette Bjorklund, Joan Sprain, Dianne Weber - 2nd Place (Wisconsin)

    The College Transition curriculum package provides high school students and their parents/ caregivers opportunities to learn to recognize and manage the normal emotions and conflicts that result from this major transition.

    Vickie Hadley, Annetta Jones, Edie Sutton, Elizabeth Kiss, Mary Ann Lienhart-Cross - 3rd Place (Indiana)

    Where Does Your Money Go? is an educational curriculum package to engage individuals in hands on basic money management activities to stabilize their personal finances.

    2008

    1st - Lynn James (Pennsylvania)

    2nd - Cindy Petersen (Minnesota)

    3rd - Bobbie Shaffett (Mississippi)

    2007

    Rosie Allen, Katie Smallwood, Patty Poor - 1st Place (Kentucky)

    Speedy Suppers is a quick meal education session that targets working moms. Quick meal recipes are demonstrated and tasted, while ideas to implement 2005 USDA Dietary Guidelines are discussed. This lecture/ demonstration curriculum was developed by a team of three Kentucky FCS Agent/Educators and has reached nearly 5,000 individuals.

    Eileen Krumbach, Andrea Nisley, Dr. John DeFrain, Lee Sherry, Ruth Vonderohe, Susan Brown, Carla Mahar, Dianne Swanson, Leanne M. Manning, Sandra D. Preston, Mary Ann Holland, Maureen Burson, LaDonna Werth - 2nd Place (Nebraska)

    Guardianship training is a courtmandated educational program for newly appointed guardians focusing on understanding what a guardian is, responsibilities to the court and Ward, implementing good decision making and understanding financial responsibilities. The Nebraska Supreme Court and Bar Association and UNL Extension have been in Partnership for five years.

    Glenice Johnson, Mary J. Anderson, Sharon M. Danes, Rebecca Hagen Jokela, Rosemary K. Heins, Susan E. Hooper, Phyllis Onstad, Cindy M. Petersen, Marlene S. Stum - 3rd Place (Minnesota)

    Designed as one-hour wo Communications Awards — Educational Publications

    2010

    Mary Lou Mueller, Linda Skogrand, Rachel Crook, Davina Spotted Elk, Irene Dayzie, Heidi LeBlanc, Reva Rosenband, Lucille Hunt, Benjamin Long - 1st Place (Utah)

    The Strong Marriages for Navajo Couples booklet was developed to help Navajo couples strengthen and improve their marriages. Culturally appropriate activities are suggested that reinforce relationship skills.

    Patreese Ingram, Jan Scholl - 2nd Place (Pennsylvania)

    A 4-H project used by youth and adults to learn diversity through the study of clothing of other cultures.

    Jan Baggarly - 3rd Place (Georgia)

    Walk Georgia encourages residents to become physically active. Individuals or team members log their daily activity on the web site allowing them to virtually travel the state.

    2009

    Ted Futris, Marissa Stone, Jorge H. Atiles, Diane Bales, Beth Bartlett, Don Bower, Connie Crawley, Gail M. Hanula, Judy A. Harrison, Melba King, Joan Koonce, Gina G. Peek, Mary Ann Robinson, Michael Rupured, Pamela Turner, William Reeves - 1st Place (Georgia)

    The Guide for New Parents (GNP) features FCS content and reaches new parents at a teachable moment. It has helped parents acquire knowledge and become familiar with FCS Cooperative Extension.

    Kathryn DiGuiseppe, Norma Jean Young - 2nd Place (Pennsylvania)

    The Pennsylvania Produce Guide publication was developed to assist consumers with "Best" practices in selection, storage, usage of produce grown and sold in Pennsylvania Farmers' markets.

    Luanne Hughes - 3rd Place (New Jersey)

    Many Americans don't meet recommendations for fruit/ vegetable intake. Why? Many consumers don't know how to put fruit/vegetable consumption recommendations into practice. This publication offers practical suggestions for increasing fruit/ vegetable consumption.

    2008

    1st - Barbara Ames (Kansas)

    2nd - Mary Holland (Nebraska)

    3rd - Cindy Oliveri (Ohio)

    2007

    Sondra Parmer, Barbara Struempler - 1st Place (Alabama)

    The colorful Make Every Plate a Rainbow puzzle is a 4-inch round sphere with vivid illustrations aimed at imparting fruit and vegetable information. It is engaging through its colorful appearance, interactive through its ability to be manipulated and informative with its messages. The puzzles were distributed to 23,500 limited-resource adults.

    Ellie McCann - 2nd Place (Minnesota)

    The Teens and Meth fact sheet is one of the issues in the Teen Talk fact sheet series. Teen Talk fact sheets are designed to help parents talk with teens about challenging topics. The hot topics are located on the University of Minnesota Extension Parenting Education Resources website at www.parenting.umn.edu.

    2006

    Cathy Faulcon Bowen and Peter Kauffman - 1st Place (Pennsylvania)

    "Credit Cards and College: Know the Facts" This brochure alerts college students to key facts about using credit cards. It is available in all Penn State Bookstores (23) across the Commonwealth. In addition, it was distributed to the University Park campus freshmen during Fall 2005 orientation and is used in other credit education sessions for adults.

    Marilyn S. Fox, Jeff Shelton and Susan Brown - 2nd Place (Nebraska)

    "Methamphetamine - One of Rural Nebraska's Greatest Challenges" One of rural America's greatest challenges is substance abuse and one of those substances is methamphetamine. Nebraska citizens have become more aware of the magnitude of the problem, how it impacts families, public health, safety, environment, and rural economic development. Strategies have been shared to help combat the growing problem.

    Annette Campbell, Lois E. Smith and Milly Kaiser - 3rd Place (Illinois)

    "Identity Theft Bulletin" Identity theft is the fastest-growing crime of the century, and University of Illi SDA Clean Homes . . . Safe and Healthy Families Program Award Recognize NEAFCS members for their innovative educational programs that help families and individuals understand the link between clean and safe homes and good health. Soap and Detergent Association

    Background

    For many years, Extension professionals have used consumer education materials produced by The Soap and Detergent Association to support their grassroots programs. The SDA Clean Homes ...Safe and Healthy Families Program of Excellence Award has been established by The Soap and Detergent Association to recognize NEAFCS members for their innovative educational programs that help families and individuals understand the link between clean and safe homes and good health.

    Award

    Two (2) Family and Consumer Sciences county professionals or team will be honored with a cash award of $500, a tabletop award and recognition in an upcoming issue of Cleaning Matters, SDA's bimonthly newsletter that reaches more than 7,000 educators and the media. In addition, the award winning programs will be highlighted on the SDA website, www.cleaning101.com.

    Purpose

    The award will honor outstanding educational programming efforts that utilize any of SDA's educational materials and promote the connection between cleanliness and health. Programs must demonstrate innovative outreach efforts that impact the local community and raise the awareness of the proper use and storage of cleaning products. Program areas include but are not limited to laundry, dishwashing, hard surface cleaning, hand hygiene, and asthma education, emergency preparedness, programming with family day homes and child care centers, youth groups and clubs.

    Eligibility

    An individual or a collaborative team may submit application. The outreach program or activity shall have been conducted by a County Extension Professional / Agent and implemented at the county local / level. The outreach program or activity shall have been conducted in the past two years. National winners will present a concurrent session or participate in the Showcase of Excellence at the Annual Session the year the award is received.

    Application

    1. Complete the On-line Awards Application and submit one printed copy.
    2. Program Outline - limit to four (4) double-spaced typed pages:
      1. Introduction - purpose, goal and objectives, target audience reached.
      2. Program description - content and materials, partnerships, leadership capacity, unique delivery methods.
      3. Program Impact - evaluation methods, results / impacts, transferability, marketing publicity.
    3. Supporting materials - program materials, photos, curriculum package examples, marketing materials - not to exceed 10 pages. Please package appropriately for the types of supplemental materials submitted. See suggestions under Communication Awards for specific supplementary materials. Put all materials securely in a three prong folder or binder.

    Judging Criteria 100 Points Total

    1. Introduction - 20 points
    2. Program Description - shows evidence that program is meeting the needs and interests of the families / and communities being served - 40 points.
      1. Content of program - 15 points.
      2. Partnerships - evidence of collaborations with other Extension workers as well as other agencies or organizations - 10 points.
      3. Leadership capacity - evidence that the Extension Service has provided the leadership to establish, implement, and evaluate the program - 10 points.
      4. Unique Delivery Methods - evidence of using unique outreach methods to implement program follow-up with program participants and document impacts of program - 5 points.
    3. Program Impact - evidence that the program met goal and objectives of effort and made a difference in lives of families and / or Healthy Lifestyles Education Grant Awarded to individual(s) with goals to create educational programs and public awareness emphasizing current health issues, including nutrition, fitness, and healthy lifestyle education.

      Background

      Awarded to individual(s) with goals to create educational programs and public awareness emphasizing current health issues, including nutrition, fitness, and healthy lifestyle education.

      Award

      One $200 award will be presented to an individual or team to develop and/or publish materials such as, but not limited to: brochures, study packets, exhibits, transparencies, videotapes, PowerPoint presentations (slide/script), media spots, or web page development start up costs. This must be for a new program, not one currently in place.

      Purpose

      Programs submitted for the Healthy Lifestyle Education Grant must be oriented towards education, research, or service in the field of health, which may include topics related to physical or mental health, wellness, disease prevention, or healthy lifestyles. This program should have significant value directly or indirectly to families and their health.

      Eligibility

      1. Application may be submitted by an individual or a team.
      2. National winner will participate in the Showcase of Excellence at annual sessions the year after the award is received to show evidence of the completed project. Money must be returned to NEAFCS if the project is not complete.

      Application

      1. Complete the On-line Awards Application and submit one printed copy.
      2. Program/Project outline - limit to five (5) double-spaced typed pages:
        1. Need or justification for the project (needs of target audience).
        2. Purpose of project (well defined purpose and objectives).
        3. Project Plan and Budget, including anticipated beginning and ending dates of project.
          1. Step-by-step - Identify a feasible budget, adequate funding. How will you use the $500 and supplemental funding sources, if needed? Include in-kind donations.
          2. Specified and qualified person(s) responsible for the operation of activity.
          3. Demonstrate the ability to complete proposed project or program.
        4. Evaluation tools demonstrating impact of program or project.
        5. Plans for reporting to NEAFCS.

      Judging Criteria 100 Points Total

      1. Plan - 65 points
        Realistic, sound
        Quality, depth
        Related to audience needs, useful
        Innovativeness
      2. Implementation - 35 points
        Financial feasibility
        Project evaluation
        Suitable to time frame

      Procedure

      1. Submit one (1) copy of the application and program outline as listed above for the Healthy Lifestyles Education Grant to the appropriate affiliate chair by the affiliate due date.
      2. Affiliate chair will mail the winning application(s) postmarked no later than April 1 to ||VPAwardsFilecard||.
 

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